Inner Armadale Line Level Crossing Removals

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The ding, ding, ding of level crossings along the Armadale Line is the sound of a safety risk and congestion point on the local road network.

As more trains start running in the future, boom gates will be down more often, increasing congestion around the crossing, and sharpening our focus on community safety and ease of movement.

To address these concerns, the METRONET Level Crossing Removal project will remove up to six vehicle level crossings on the Inner Armadale Line.

Removing the Mint Street, Oats Street, Welshpool Road, Hamilton Street, Wharf Street and William Street level crossings is an opportunity to improve road safety, ease movements in the area, modernise stations and create versatile public spaces for the community.


Following extensive early planning and seeing the success of similar projects in the eastern states, the current preferred solution is to elevate the rail for up to five of these crossings, except at Hamilton Street, where land on either side of the railway has been reserved.

The elevated solutions preferred for this project will result in Carlisle, Oats Street, Beckenham and potentially Queens Park stations being rebuilt. Due to low patronage, Welshpool Station will close, and the new Oats Street Station will service the Welshpool area. Two options for removing the Wharf Street level crossing were initially put forward, elevating the rail or closing the crossing.

Based on initial stakeholder feedback on the Wharf Street options, an additional option is now being considered which would see elevated rail at both Hamilton Street and Wharf Street, including rebuilding Queens Park Station. The option to close the Wharf Street level crossing is not preferred.

To help inform project planning as it continues, we want to know what you think we should consider. Your valuable feedback will be provided to the design team and the two Community Reference Groups.

For more information on the project visit our website.

The survey and community reference group nominations has now closed. We will announce details of the survey and Community Reference Group members by the end of August. The team is also holding community drop-in sessions on August 15 and 22, more details can be found in 'Key Dates'.

The ding, ding, ding of level crossings along the Armadale Line is the sound of a safety risk and congestion point on the local road network.

As more trains start running in the future, boom gates will be down more often, increasing congestion around the crossing, and sharpening our focus on community safety and ease of movement.

To address these concerns, the METRONET Level Crossing Removal project will remove up to six vehicle level crossings on the Inner Armadale Line.

Removing the Mint Street, Oats Street, Welshpool Road, Hamilton Street, Wharf Street and William Street level crossings is an opportunity to improve road safety, ease movements in the area, modernise stations and create versatile public spaces for the community.


Following extensive early planning and seeing the success of similar projects in the eastern states, the current preferred solution is to elevate the rail for up to five of these crossings, except at Hamilton Street, where land on either side of the railway has been reserved.

The elevated solutions preferred for this project will result in Carlisle, Oats Street, Beckenham and potentially Queens Park stations being rebuilt. Due to low patronage, Welshpool Station will close, and the new Oats Street Station will service the Welshpool area. Two options for removing the Wharf Street level crossing were initially put forward, elevating the rail or closing the crossing.

Based on initial stakeholder feedback on the Wharf Street options, an additional option is now being considered which would see elevated rail at both Hamilton Street and Wharf Street, including rebuilding Queens Park Station. The option to close the Wharf Street level crossing is not preferred.

To help inform project planning as it continues, we want to know what you think we should consider. Your valuable feedback will be provided to the design team and the two Community Reference Groups.

For more information on the project visit our website.

The survey and community reference group nominations has now closed. We will announce details of the survey and Community Reference Group members by the end of August. The team is also holding community drop-in sessions on August 15 and 22, more details can be found in 'Key Dates'.

Drop-in session question submission

Got a question about the project? Submit your questions to the team here ahead of the drop-in session so we can make sure we have all the information on hand to answer them. To see past questions answered by our project team see here.

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You state in the Oats St Q&A document that "we will look at having a continuous PSP connection along the railway", this implies that you are considering not having a continuous PSP. What is the minimum level of PSP that the project can commit to providing?

Scott C about 5 hours ago

Will the proposed embankments have retaining walls to minimise their bulk or will they have engineered slopes?Much of the discussion of the visual impact of the elevated railways in the previous Q&A documents relates to the viaduct sections and does not address the 8 to 10 embankments that are planned to be built, each of which would be expected to be around 300m long and a solid obstruction, likely topped with noise walls. What will be done to address the visual impacts of these embankments?

Scott C about 5 hours ago

Underground the section of rail between or at least initially between Rivervale Subway and Welshpool Train Station.(I note that the Overhead Option was not implemented on the Fremantle Line around Subiaco Train Station).

Glyn Shipley 1 day ago

We should be looking at a viaduct as an opportunity to activate or develop areas underneath the railway.A building with a railway on its roof will appear less imposing and out of scale than an elevated railway on concrete piers. Noise is also likely reduced by the surrounding building, and noise treatments can reduce noise within the building. Façade treatments and noise walls on the viaduct will improve the visual appeal of the structure over bare concrete.The railway along Flinders St in Melbourne succinctly demonstrates the dichotomy of an elevated railway – from Queen’s Bridge west is everything the community fears an elevated will become. From the Queen’s Bridge east is a different experience, with street activation and commercial tenancies.Other examples can be seen at http://www.ctie.co.jp/kokubunken/pdf/publication/2017_08.pdf including:· Musashisakai Station (Tokyo) and surrounds· Viaduc du arts (Paris)At Oats st, the adjacent TAFE could be expanded eastward, and Bank St between Somerset and Oats St turned into a promenade or other shared space. Alternatively, commercial space for noisy businesses (such as gyms, etc) could be leased by PTA (including potentially bringing back the IGA the community recently lost on Orrong Rd). At a minimum, a deli/mini market should be considered.Facilities such as Australia Post parcel lockers or click and collect areas should also be investigated at the stations, allowing passengers to pick up parcels on the way home (and leveraging Oats St’s position as an interchange station).Playgrounds, outdoor fitness equipment and other community spaces could be provided under the viaduct adjacent to shops or offices. This would have the double effect of providing a covered area for children to play in wet or hot weather, and provide further passive surveillance to deter antisocial behaviour.Additional space could be reserved for general open space, or local events (market days, etc).Spaces in heavy industrial areas (e.g. Welshpool) could be leased for storage to neighbouring businesses.Any structures in the rail corridor would require the nearby 132kV transmission lines to be relocated or (preferably) buried, which would help to offset the visual impact of the elevated rail.As mentioned in the Community information session hosted over Zoom, most drivers to Welshpool station arrive from further East via Welshpool Rd. Consequently, car parking for the new Oats St station should be provided to the South of the station, adjacent to the industrial area (i.e. From Milford Rd South). Access from Welshpool Rd along Rutland Ave or Bank St will need to be allowed for. Provision for amenities such as EV charging and expansion without requiring additional disruptive works should be made.That’s my (long) 2 cents, thankyou for the opportunity to explain my thoughts.

Michael_C 3 days ago

Why on Earth opt for overhead rail lines? Early 20th Century idea - now out-dated, just like 19th Century level crossings. They are ugly, potentially noisy, involve risk of accidents and exclude the opportunity to use the land for parks and other purposes. Sinking the lines avoids those downside factors, allows for re-purposing the land above and potential for re-joining some streets if the need arises. Yes, it will cost more but - given current conditions - aren't we looking to create more infrastructure jobs and skilled workers over the next several years. Aren't we also hoping to modernise and "green up" our city for the future? Please take a more future-oriented view of this aspect of the Metronet project and its effects on Perth's future.

Bill Newman 8 days ago

Closing Welshpool station is short sighted and unnecessary. 1. This is an inner metropolitan station that is close to residential areas that are only going to become more population dense in the next decade. 2. Making all Welshpool customers go to Oats Street is going to put too much pressure on parking and make a busy area even busier. There is heaps of space to park at Welshpool. 3. Saying there is low patronage is not a good enough reason. Attract some customers from Oats Street with free parking. Find out why you have low patronage and change something. 4. Instead of spending money on upgrading stations that are just fine (pulling up all the paving and shelters and adding new ones) spend money on increasing the access to public transport, like keeping stations open. 6. This will not encourage anyone to use their car less. Sure fix congestion but don't actively encourage people to drive instead of train because they now can't park or get to their local station. 7. Not everyone accesses the stations by car. I can walk to Welshpool in a reasonable amount of time. No way could I walk to Oats Street as part of my commute. And there is no bus. If people can't access their local stations by bus or on foot then of course they will drive and make congestion worse.

Grumpy in Canning 8 days ago

Have you taken increasing temperatures due to global warming over the coming decades into consideration?All elevated rail systems that I've ever run into generate more noise from trains. Queens Park already endures aircraft noise levels which far exceed levels reached by the heartiest rooster. Why have you chosen this method, as opposed to running the trains underground as at the Subiaco stop? Is it primarily because of the cost?

Mike Ballard 8 days ago

Attn City of Canning & Department of Transport;In my opinion, making Hamilton & Wharf Streets as both Rail-Over-Road (Option 3) would mean: (i) Less road section re-work for the Hamilton Street/Sevenoaks St-Railway Pde multi-intersection & (ii) Ensure the rail incline/decline sections is spread over the longer distance across two intersection, instead of just the solitary single section. Making it over just one section would make the incline/decline rail "hump" appear too acute (If you know what I mean).

Joe Benjamin 9 days ago

It has been put forward by the project team that William St has to be elevated as land has not been planned/procurred to enable road bridge. The land has been. The only bit not in place is the petrol station but the owners have known for at least 25 years that their land is earmarked to enable bridge.

Ron Mitchell 9 days ago

I really don't know why u persist with these meetings. You have already decided to go ahead with overhead rail lines. I live opposite Queens Park Station - it will ruin my outlook, the noise, the value on my property, and the 'social space' under the line will only contribute to anti social behaviour. I went to a sessions a number of years ago, when it was first mentioned (after I bought my unit) that the line was going underground. To heck with the cost now, stop all these catch ups with consultants - put that money to doing a job of under ground lines. We could then have the open space from Railway Pde across to the shopping centre - as fist mentioned years ago. Funny how this ugly plan is along our line - am sure it would not happen to the panel who apparently don't live along a rail line. Disappointed.

Gayler 9 days ago

Hi I like the idea of Option 3. Will there be lifts or easy access for the elderly and wheelchair people? Also how will it work for people on Railway parade and Sevenoaks Street crossing WIlliam Street? Will there be lights installed as with Wharf and Hamilton Streets?

Norma 9 days ago

The level crossing removal project will be great

Andrew Foley about 2 months ago

Your information is wrong and misleading.The newsfeed says: Oats Street, Mint Street and Welshpool RoadThursday 25 June 20206.30pm-8pmBut when you register it says July 2. Which one is it?

celene about 2 months ago

How will the shelters from the recently upgraded Beckenham Station be repurposed?

davoaj about 2 months ago

On the newsfeed tab it says your information session for Hamilton, Wharf and William Street is Thursday the 2nd of July but when you click on the Eventbrite link it says Thursday 9th of July. Can you please confirm the date of this information session please?

Ryan B about 2 months ago

How will the removal of the level crossings affect people on bicycles riding along the shared path from Gosnells to Perth? Currently the level crossings allow bike riders to cross the traffic more easily when the train crossing barrier is down. If the road is too busy to cross along the railway line, sometimes you just need to wait a bit longer and the cars have to stop for the crossing, so I can ride across safely. If bike riders and pedestrians are delayed too long/no gaps in the traffic, many will start driving again and add to the congestion issue on our roads. Please cater well for bike riders and pedestrians so we don' need to use our cars so much.

Jillian Woolmer about 2 months ago

Armadale level crossing removal will be popular

Andrew Foley about 2 months ago