Swan River Crossings

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Swan River Crossing Project Overview

Have your say as we plan for the Swan River Crossings project

We are replacing the Fremantle Traffic Bridge with a solution that considers road, passenger and freight rail, maritime, pedestrian and cycling connectivity across the Swan River.

The Fremantle Traffic Bridge was opened in 1939 as a temporary crossing and has served its function well.

However, the bridge's structure has been deteriorating over a number of years and, despite extensive strengthening and maintenance works (including a highly disruptive closure in 2016), the bridge needs to be replaced.

The project is highly complex and is situated in a challenging area, a range of priorities - environmental, heritage, community, topography, navigational issues are all being investigated to develop a solution .

The project will:

  • replace the Fremantle Traffic Bridge
  • include a new rail bridge for passenger rail - providing an opportunity to expand passenger and freight rail access into Fremantle
  • include a new principal shared path for pedestrians and cyclists connecting North Fremantle Station to the new bridge and across the Swan River
  • seek to retain parts of the old bridge on the southern foreshore for future community use

An enormous amount of work needs to be done to design the new crossings. This includes environmental, geotechnical and engineering investigations as well as heritage and urban landscape and design planning. In July 2020, we invited the community to become involved in shaping the development and design of the Swan River Crossings Project over coming months, and ultimately through to construction. Along with our engineering and technical investigations, we are considering your feedback as we refine the preferred alignment and progress the design.

Read about the planned new crossings by viewing our FAQs or the project update in the document library.

To stay informed on project information and upcoming events subscribe for updates via the project website.

Have your say as we plan for the Swan River Crossings project

We are replacing the Fremantle Traffic Bridge with a solution that considers road, passenger and freight rail, maritime, pedestrian and cycling connectivity across the Swan River.

The Fremantle Traffic Bridge was opened in 1939 as a temporary crossing and has served its function well.

However, the bridge's structure has been deteriorating over a number of years and, despite extensive strengthening and maintenance works (including a highly disruptive closure in 2016), the bridge needs to be replaced.

The project is highly complex and is situated in a challenging area, a range of priorities - environmental, heritage, community, topography, navigational issues are all being investigated to develop a solution .

The project will:

  • replace the Fremantle Traffic Bridge
  • include a new rail bridge for passenger rail - providing an opportunity to expand passenger and freight rail access into Fremantle
  • include a new principal shared path for pedestrians and cyclists connecting North Fremantle Station to the new bridge and across the Swan River
  • seek to retain parts of the old bridge on the southern foreshore for future community use

An enormous amount of work needs to be done to design the new crossings. This includes environmental, geotechnical and engineering investigations as well as heritage and urban landscape and design planning. In July 2020, we invited the community to become involved in shaping the development and design of the Swan River Crossings Project over coming months, and ultimately through to construction. Along with our engineering and technical investigations, we are considering your feedback as we refine the preferred alignment and progress the design.

Read about the planned new crossings by viewing our FAQs or the project update in the document library.

To stay informed on project information and upcoming events subscribe for updates via the project website.