Westport In The Media

See Westport's latest news below.

See Westport's latest news below.

  • Port investment is the key, Bunbury Herald 27/8/2019

    3 months ago
    Bh



  • Westport announces shortlist of port strategy options, Infrastructure Magazine 23/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Port

    By Kim Ho

    The Westport Taskforce Steering Committee has announced its shortlist of five strategies for the long-term management of Western Australia’s growing freight needs. The shortlist includes three standalone options for Kwinana Port and two shared Fremantle/Kwinana options.

    The Westport Taskforce was established in 2017 by the WA Minister for Transport to inform future governance on port trade over the next 50 years and beyond.

    After conducting extensive consultation and research throughout 2018-9, the Taskforce developed a ‘long-list’ of 25 options was based on research and information, including historical data about container ports and Fremantle Ports, the latest port...

    By Kim Ho

    The Westport Taskforce Steering Committee has announced its shortlist of five strategies for the long-term management of Western Australia’s growing freight needs. The shortlist includes three standalone options for Kwinana Port and two shared Fremantle/Kwinana options.

    The Westport Taskforce was established in 2017 by the WA Minister for Transport to inform future governance on port trade over the next 50 years and beyond.

    After conducting extensive consultation and research throughout 2018-9, the Taskforce developed a ‘long-list’ of 25 options was based on research and information, including historical data about container ports and Fremantle Ports, the latest port and freight innovations and modelling by both government agencies and the private sector.

    To determine the best options among the 25, the performance of each was tested across a range of important criteria shaped by community consultation and stakeholder feedback. This process – known as a multi-criteria analysis – allowed all of the options to be ranked in terms of how they best meet the long-term freight needs of Western Australia.

    The first multi-criteria analysis (MCA-1) has now been completed and the top five shortlisted options are:

    1. A land-backed conventional port in Kwinana
    2. A shared-port option featuring Kwinana and Fremantle
    3. Another shared-port option employing a possible new mode of container transportation with the Blue Highway barging concept
    4. An innovative new light footprint port in Kwinana that utilises Latitude 32 as an IMT
    5. A conventional island port in Kwinana
    1. Standalone conventional land-backed port at Kwinana

    Kwinana Option 23 was the top-ranked option in MCA-1. This option is a standalone conventional land-backed port handling the full forecasted container task of 3.8 million TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit). It has an intermodal terminal (IMT) as part of the port precinct and is more reliant on road transport over rail.

    The port extends along the coastline between the Kwinana Bulk Terminal and the Alcoa jetty. It is serviced by an extended Anketell Road that connects through to Tonkin Highway, and a rail track duplication between the Cockburn Triangle and Kwinana Industrial Area.

    This option was strong across all criteria and topped the rankings regardless of which criteria were given the highest weighting.

    The option scored highly on all criteria, except land availability and beach access/use. It has good land transport connections and low environmental impacts in comparison to other options. Its tried-and-tested conventional port design will present fewer challenges, and it frees up Fremantle for alternative use.

    However, connecting the last kilometre of Anketell Road and the rail line through to the port may be challenging, given existing land holdings and infrastructure in the area. The port will also displace the Kwinana horse beach, and hydrodynamic impacts on Cockburn Sound still to be thoroughly tested.

    2. Shared Fremantle/Kwinana port scenario

    This strategy involves a shared port scenario. Kwinana Option 24 and Fremantle Option 2 were the highest-ranked shared-port option and the second-highest-scoring option in MCA-1.

    The Kwinana port component is essentially the same design as Option 23, but with a slightly smaller port footprint as it would handle the freight task in partnership with Fremantle. It has an IMT as part of the port precinct, is reliant on roads over rail, and is serviced by an extended Anketell Road and duplicated rail track between the Cockburn Triangle and Kwinana Industrial Area.

    The Fremantle component (Option 2) is the existing Inner Harbour footprint but with some additional road, rail and operational enhancements.

    Kwinana Bulk Jetty. Credit: Fremantle Ports.

    3. Shared-port scenario with Blue Highway concept

    This dual-option – Fremantle Option 2 and Kwinana Option 24 – is the same as the second-ranked option except it incorporates the Blue Highway concept of transporting containers from Fremantle to Kwinana on shallow draught barges.

    This scenario has been included in the shortlist to allow Westport to thoroughly investigate the viability of the Blue Highway – which is a common method of transporting containers upstream in other countries – for this particular scenario.

    For the purposes of MCA-2, the Blue Highway concept will be tested as an end-state. However, it is more likely feasible as a temporary mode of transporting containers from Fremantle to Kwinana during a transition phase, due to its low capital cost requirements.

    The Blue Highway concept proposes containers being moved directly from the large container ships onto small barges using specially-designed loading equipment. The barges would then transport the containers directly down to the Kwinana port for off-loading onto trucks.

    A benefit of the Blue Highway is that less dredging may be required due to the shallower depth of the barges.

    The intermodal facility on the Kwinana port would allow for containers to be shifted directly from the barge gantry onto trucks, as shown in Image 1 (top right). This would save
    on time and infrastructure costs.

    For additional investigation is whether the shipping conditions along the coast of Perth may require a breakwater to be built to protect the barges and container transfer operations. Further, the operational costs of this option are likely to be high given the requirement to invest in specialised equipment and barges.

    4. Light footprint standalone port at Kwinana

    Kwinana Option 11 is a standalone option handling the full 3.8 million TEU container task. It has a physically smaller footprint than a conventional port as the IMT operations are decoupled and located in a separate area – in this instance, at Latitude 32.

    The theory is that a narrower port will have better marine environmental outcomes, however this concept is relatively new for container ports and must be further tested. Containers would be moved to or from the ship via Automated Guided Vehicles (AGV) that transfers them over a 4km ‘land bridge’ to the IMT at Latitude 32, where they are then transferred to trains or trucks.

    This option is located in the north of Cockburn Sound. It will be serviced by an expanded Rowley Road linking directly through to Tonkin Highway, and a freight rail duplication between the Cockburn Triangle and the Kwinana Industrial Area.

    It connects to land immediately south of the Naval Base shacks and extends south-west into Cockburn Sound past the Alcoa jetty utilising the existing channel. Ships would enter and leave the port from the south.

    5. Standalone conventional island port at Kwinana

    In Kwinana Option 14, this port could handle the full 3.8 million TEU with an IMT facility as part of the island port precinct. The port connects to land adjacent to the Kwinana Industrial Area and the island extends north-westerly in Cockburn Sound towards the Alcoa jetty. Ships enter the channel from the north.

    This port is mainly road-reliant and serviced by an expanded Anketell Road, but also requires a duplicated freight rail track between the Cockburn Triangle and Kwinana Industrial Area.

    What criteria were used to assess the options?

    With the benefit of input from stakeholders, a list of assessment criteria was identified that would assist in separating and emphasising the differences between the options, and help determine a clear ranking.

    The purpose of MCA-1 was to:

    • Measure how well the options performed against ranking across all criteria the essential components that make up a successful port and supply chain
    • Highlight the strengths and weaknesses of each option
    • Test each option’s reliance on just one or two areas of strength – rather than an acceptable or high ranking across all criteria – by conducting sensitivity testing
    • Allocate scores which would allow the top-ranked options to be taken forward to the next stage of testing

    Fremantle Harbour. Image credit: Tourism WA.

    Ranking the options

    To apply the assessment criteria to the 25 options to determine their scores and ranking, Westport held more than 16 hours of workshops with subject matter experts.

    For every option, a score of one-to-five was assigned for each criterion; one being the worst performing option and fve the best performing option (with at least one best- and worst-performing option assigned for every criterion). This allocated the options a final score out of 500 points.

    Surprisingly, a stand-alone Fremantle option did not make Westport’s shortlist. The Taskforce found that, contrary to popular belief, a strategy involving an existing port is not necessarily the cheaper option.

    The high cumulative capital costs, concerns over the long-term sustainability and scalability and large levels of social impact meant that the two standalone Fremantle options in Westport’s long-list (Option 1 and Option 3) performed poorly in the MCA-1 ratings when assessed against other options. Consequently, these two options will not proceed any further in Westport’s process.

    Similarly, while Bunbury Port does not feature in the shortlisted options, the Taskforce identified plenty of opportunities for future growth and expansion. Westport found that growing the local container task may eventually lead to the critical mass required to establish a niche stevedore operation at the port.

    Establishing a container operation at Bunbury Port would encourage large industries to operate in the area – especially with such an abundance of industrial land available close to the port. Facilitating industrial development could also spur social and economic development for the region as it would create skilled job opportunities for locals and bring more people to the area for work purposes.

    The future of Westport

    This shortlist will now go through a second, even more rigorous multi-criteria analysis (MCA-2) and a cost-benefit analysis to determine the strongest option. This work will form the basis of Westport’s recommendations for managing Perth’s expanding freight task long-term.

    Westport is scheduled to provide a final recommendation (or most and second-most preferred options) to the WA Government at the end of 2019.

    Read Infrastructure’s interview with Nicole Lockwood, Chair of the Westport Taskforce. View more information on the five shortlisted options here, and a complete long-list of 25 options here.


  • Premier Mark McGowan interview, ABC Breakfast Radio 2/8/19

    4 months ago
    Download

    Talkback with Premier of Western Australia Mark McGowan

    Nadia
    Which brings me to Roe 8, Premier. Your government was virtually laughing at Liberal Leader Liza Harvey for promising to build Roe 8 and this week you talked about the fact that 20 percent of freight is onto rail which is a great achievement but for those people on Leach Highway this morning can you tell them how many cars are off that road? Has their congestion eased?

    Premier
    The more you get freight on rail obviously the more you ease congestion. So at various points in time in the last...

    Talkback with Premier of Western Australia Mark McGowan

    Nadia
    Which brings me to Roe 8, Premier. Your government was virtually laughing at Liberal Leader Liza Harvey for promising to build Roe 8 and this week you talked about the fact that 20 percent of freight is onto rail which is a great achievement but for those people on Leach Highway this morning can you tell them how many cars are off that road? Has their congestion eased?

    Premier
    The more you get freight on rail obviously the more you ease congestion. So at various points in time in the last 10 years its been about 10 per cent of containers going into Fremantle Port. It’s now double that on rail. That means doubling the number of movements that go onto rail and therefore away from trucks.

    Look we didn’t support Roe 8 at the election. We were elected on that promise. And the reason for that is threefold.

    One is: It is environmentally damaging for the Beeliar wetlands.

    Two is: Roe 8 actually stops 2 or 3 kilometres short of Fremantle Port. To build the highway to Fremantle Port then costs billions and billions of dollars more and involves all sorts of disruption to get it there.

    And thirdly: Fremantle Port itself is going to fill up. So you spend 3, 4, 5 billion dollars on road works to get to Fremantle Port which is going to fill. So what we said is we are going to get more freight on rail and we are actually going to start the work on getting a new port in Kwinana which has been talked about for decades and we are actually progressing that.

    Nadia
    You haven’t committed to it though.

    Premier
    No, but the Westport Taskforce will come down later this year and will provide a blueprint. A road map forward on that. But if you spend billions of dollars on roads to a port that’s filling, that’s billions of dollars you can’t spend on a new container port. Now to me, I’m economically I think pretty responsible, I try to look for what is the long-term solution. The long-term solution is more freight on rail and a new port in Kwinana. So that’s the approach we’ve adopted.

    I hate to be political Nadia but the the Opposition Leader said tolls. Now the thing about tolls...

    Nadia
    No she didn’t, she said a levy – there’s a difference.

    Premier
    No she didn’t, she said tolls. So the thing about tolls is if you introduce a toll, it will eventually become a toll for cars and once we get into the area of tolls for cars, it sort of means that Western Australia has gone the same way as Victoria, New South Wales and the rest of them. Where you make these mistakes.

    Nadia
    But if there’s a growing appetite. She wants to have this debate again in the lead up to the next election.

    Russell
    And you’d think if they have picked this one – quickly – if they’ve picked this to be the fight at the next election they must’ve done it on the back of some research. They could not have just pulled this out of a magic hat.

    Nadia
    And if there is a growing public sentiment towards Roe 8, would you ever consider changing your mind?

    Premier
    For the reasons I said – she’s just announced this, this is billions of dollars of spend. We are the only government that has debt going down in Australia. The only one. There’s nine governments in Australia, one has debt going down, all the rest have debt going up. What she’s done is commit more money towards a road that won’t fix the problem because Fremantle Port is filling. It won’t be a lasting solution.

    Nadia
    So then you have to commit to the Kwinana Harbour.

    Premier
    Yeah. And that’s what the Westport process is doing as we speak. So we have a body chaired by Nicole Lockwood, who you might’ve heard of, and a group of industry experts. They will produce a report later this year and will give us a long-term blueprint.

    Ends
  • There's no perfect solution to Perth’s future freight needs, Sydney Morning Herald 19/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Nic
    By now you have probably seen that the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options to meet Perth’s long-term freight growth.

    Westport’s extensive analysis to date has determined these to be the five best options for the state, when weighed up against a range of important environmental, economic and social criteria.

    Continue reading...

    By now you have probably seen that the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options to meet Perth’s long-term freight growth.

    Westport’s extensive analysis to date has determined these to be the five best options for the state, when weighed up against a range of important environmental, economic and social criteria.

    Continue reading...

  • Port Debate, Nine News Perth 15/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Nine
    A new port at Kwinana is being floated as the best option for WA's future freight needs.
    Five shortlisted options have been revealed but the State Opposition says the report is 'fatally flawed'.

    Watch here.

    A new port at Kwinana is being floated as the best option for WA's future freight needs.
    Five shortlisted options have been revealed but the State Opposition says the report is 'fatally flawed'.

    Watch here.

  • Port Plan, ABC iView 7pm report 15/8/19

    4 months ago
    Parking pik
  • Farewell Freo? Channel 7 15/8/2019

    4 months ago
    7
  • Westport Taskforce defend their report into WA’s future freight needs, 6PR 16/8/2019

    4 months ago
    6pr

    Yesterday, The Westport Taskforce handed down a report unveiling a short list ranking its top five options to meet Western Australia’s future freight needs, with a strong recommendation to build a new Outer Harbour in Kwinana. The Independent Chair of the Westport Taskforce, Nicole Lockwood spoke with Gareth and explains why Roe 8 and 9 weren’t included in their independent report.

    Gareth also spoke with Shadow Transport Minister, Libby Mettam “I feel the taxpayers of WA have every right to feel ripped off, we’ve seen twenty millions dollars invested in a report with a predetermined outcome.” She then went on...

    Yesterday, The Westport Taskforce handed down a report unveiling a short list ranking its top five options to meet Western Australia’s future freight needs, with a strong recommendation to build a new Outer Harbour in Kwinana. The Independent Chair of the Westport Taskforce, Nicole Lockwood spoke with Gareth and explains why Roe 8 and 9 weren’t included in their independent report.

    Gareth also spoke with Shadow Transport Minister, Libby Mettam “I feel the taxpayers of WA have every right to feel ripped off, we’ve seen twenty millions dollars invested in a report with a predetermined outcome.” She then went on to say “The trigger for this report is that the government said they would pursue the Outer Harbour as an alternative to Roe 8 and Roe 9.”

    Listen here...

    TRANSCRIPT

    GARETH PARKER
    Yesterday, the Westport Taskforce handed down a couple of reports in their ongoing series of work which is planning for the long-term of the freight needs for Perth and the South West of Australia.
    Now, they had a long list of about 25 different options for the future of Fremantle Port and perhaps a new port at Kwinana and maybe even Bunbury. They’ve narrowed that down to a short0list of five but I reckon there’s serious questions to be answered here about why one of the major infrastructure projects which is intricately related to the future of Fremantle Port, was excluded entirely from their calculations.
    On the chair… sorry, on the line, is the Independent Chair of the Westport Taskforce, Nicole Lockwood… [greetings not transcribed]…
    According to your analysis, Fremantle Port currently handles about 700,000 containers a year, you reckon that it could handle up to 3.8 million containers a year. Given that’s the case, why are all of your five recommendations so hot to trot on a new port at Kwinana?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So the work we’ve done is the first time there’s ever been a piece done looking at port, road, rail and intermodal, not to support precinct itself. And we are comfortable with the fact that the wharf at Fremantle has capacity to grow but the issue for Freo is very much about the road and rail connections in, and when we’ve done our analysis across a range of criteria, looking at all of those different inputs, the Kwinana options come out far above the Fremantle options for that long-term forecast of 3.8 million.

    GARETH PARKER
    So, if the key issue is the road and rail connections into and out of Fremantle Port, how could you do that analysis without doing anything at all to factor in a possible construction of Roe 8 and Roe 9?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Hmmm. So as I think we’ve chatted before on this, and as you understand, we were set up as a result of the last government coming into pow… or this government coming into power and part of their election commitment was on the basis of the Roe 8 alignment and concerns the community had raised around that. So our scope was about looking at solutions to solve the pre... freight problem and the road alignment was not part of our scope.
    Now what we’ve been able to do… so in doing that, we had to look for other options to deal with the road issue and Leach Highway was the one we spent all of our time on and it’s been a very interesting exercise because in doing that, we’ve understood what needs to happen to any road corridor to get into Fremantle to allow that to grow and particularly, what has to happen in the last mile leading into the port. So…

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, and I’ll come to that analysis in a moment but I think what you just said is very important. The reality is that as you undertook this exercise, there was a political consideration in your way, which was that because Labor say they don’t want to do Roe 8 and 9, you… that was never on the table.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Correct, that was not part of the scope we were given.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. So is that independent, if we’re talking about the future of freight needs, or not?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Well we were given the opportunity to look at the whole network, one component of that was not part of the picture, but at… at the end of the day that was a decision made on the basis of a strong community view that the Government decided was their agenda going forward. So that was a decision they’d already made prior to us being established.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, but this… I mean, this has to be considered a politically compromised exercise then?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Well I think it’s interesting because when you actually look at where the work’s taken us and where we’ve landed. If Fremantle had scored more strongly across the range of criteria, you could potentially say we would need to go back and look at Roe 8 to make sure that… really be the tipping point. But the work we’ve done has demonstrated conclusively that in terms of the volume of spend that you need to expend either in Fremantle or at Kwinana, it’s very similar.
    So it’s not… you know, this idea that Fremantle is a cheaper option, it’s a no-cost option therefore we should continue to allow it to grow, and Roe 8 being one of the corridors to
    do that, that doesn’t make sense when you look at the scale of investment required to keep it alive. So when you’ve got that sort of money on the table and you need a long-term solution and when you want the ability to remove that impact from the community and have ability to grow freight, Kwinana comes out superior.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. If you factor in what the Labor Government’s announced around High Street and the roundabout at Stirling Highway and assume that that’s going to happen, when does Fremantle Port fill up, assuming there’s no more capital spending on Fremantle Port?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So we’ve done… Main Roads on our behalf has done probably the most detailed micro-simulation that’s ever been done on a road corridor for WA and they’ve looked in… at length at the growth of the population in and around the corridor, and the growth in freight over that time frame. And we’re saying, in the early 20… early-to-mid 2030s, that network becomes problematic. Both in terms of becoming efficient I suppose for freight vehicles.
    And similarly the rail corridor, we’ve done the same set of work, we can grow that but the new traffic bridge which would allow a new dedicated path for rail, that will give us some growth potential but at about the same point, sort of early-to-mid 2030s we hit a constraint on rail and we’d have to do a major upgrade. So that’s with business as usual, that’s will no change to operating practices…

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. So… so, just so I understand that, the Government has already announced that they’re going to do the High Street and the roundabout upgrades, they’ve also announced that they want to build a second, or a replacement for the Fremantle Traffic Bridge which will have a rail component. If you do those two things, then Fremantle Port will continue to operate, or can continue to operate until about the mid-2030s. So another 11… what, 15 years from now.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Yep, within that time frame, that’s the timeframe we’re looking at for it to… to continue to operate as it.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. So when would you start construction of a future Kwinana Port on that basis?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So we’ve said about 10 years it would take you. So five for planning and approvals and five for construction, to deliver and have operating a new facility. So you’d want to come back from that date at a point at which you think you want to get started, and obviously the issue in all of this is there’s forecasting involved which is an imperfect science. So in a lot of ways, given that the first part of the exercise is… is a technical exercise, that work would start soon, to allow the Government some time. If… if we have more
    capacity and Fremantle improved it’s productivity, then we can take our foot of the pedal and if not, you know, everyone is ready for when it’s required.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, so working backwards, if you want to deliver a port in Kwinana, in the mid-2030’s, say 2035, you don’t need to start doing that 10 years of work for another five years.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Well that’s also thinking about the fact that what we don’t want to do is run ourselves to the point where the network is… is very, very difficult to manage. So those numbers are about when things get very congested. So I think there’d be an appetite to make sure that we didn’t get to that end point, that there was actually a little bit of a buffer around that date. But certainly in the… in the next few years, that would be definitely a recommendation.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. Your number one option, I know there’s a short-list of five, but just describe the number one option. What do you think is the best scenario?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So this is in order of how they’re ranked in the first round of criteria assessment and we will look at them all equally now for the second round, because it’s more detailed. But the first one looked at a land-backed facility, so very traditional-style port, off the coastline at Kwinana, most close to the Anketell Road alignment and it really deals with all of the port operations on the footprint of that site, as Fremantle does. So similar operating model. Then we deal with the supply chain out of there by road and rail and… pretty much straight down Anketell Road and up Tonkin Highway, with a totally dedicated… no… no traffic lights basically the whole way through to the North West corridors.

    GARETH PARKER
    And so that’s… would that replace Fremantle Port entirely?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That one… yes, that one does replace Freo entirely.

    GARETH PARKER
    And what would be the timeframe for that?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So that’s again… you know, looking at, I suppose, the tolerances on road and rail for Fremantle, it would be the same sort of timeframe. So what we’re doing is in stage two, which is the work we’re doing now, is looking at timing and staging and transition planning. So understanding if you were to move the entire task out of Fremantle, how
    would you do that? Would you do it steps, would you do it in one hit? And obviously we have two port options for the shared, so how would they work over time?

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. What happens next in your process?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So now we’ve got the five, we’re… we’re doing a further layer of analysis both from a costing perspective, environmental analysis in terms of impacts, we’re looking at social impacts of all of these options, economic development opportunities that come from them, both in terms of jobs and in terms of redevelopment opportunities. And they’ll be put through a second round of multi-criteria assessment and then a cost benefit analysis.
    So the five go through that next step and then they will come out in a ranked order with our ability to provide to Government by the end of the year, a preferred option or potentially two preferred options if there is two that are very close that have trade-offs. We may say to Government, look you’ve got, you know, optionality here and it’s then a call for them to make.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. Nicole, thank you for your time.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    My pleasure.

    GARETH PARKER
    Nicole Lockwood, the chair of the Westport Taskforce.

    Ends..

    Interview with Libby Mettam

    GARETH PARKER
    Libby Mettam is the shadow transport minister from the Liberal Party… [greetings not transcribed]…
    What do you make of it?

    LIBBY METTAM
    I think the taxpayers of WA have every right to feel ripped off. We’ve… we’ve seen $20 million invested in a report with a predetermined outcome. Ben Wyatt is already on record saying he’ll resign if the outer harbour doesn’t progress and this so-called independent rep… inquiry has been… is… well, the taskforce is built of… with government appointees and public servants with a predetermined outcome.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. Well even if you go on the sort of… the base case that the Government want, you wouldn’t need to do anything, you wouldn’t need to start a new port for at least five years, assuming it takes 10 years to complete.

    LIBBY METTAM
    Yeah and… and we are at the status quo. The… the trigger for this report is that the Government said that they would pursue the outer harbour as a alternative to Roe 8 and Roe 9 but the poor people of the south metro area in the meantime still suffer from significant congestion issues.
    I should also point out that if we do progress with a dedicated outer harbour and shut down Fremantle Port, this certainly won’t resolve the issues of congestion in that area because we will see… you know, there’ll be potentially high-density living in that area which will create a lot of road and transport issues in themselves and there will be significant infrastructure and transport costs associated with developing the outer harbour, such as, you know, upgrading Anketell Road, Tonkin Highway and the duplication of rail as well.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, thank you for your time, Libby.
    Libby Mettam the shadow transport minister.

    Ends..



  • Westport Taskforce options, ABC Breakfast Radio, 15/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Download
    9.25am

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Now you’ll remember the debate about the Roe 8 highway extension and the question about what is the best way to get freight to port in Perth. Is it road, is it rail, do we need a new port altogether. Well the Government put together the Westport Taskforce to come up with some long-term options on that, and we are talking 50 years into the future. But if you’re going to do it you have to start planning now.
    And Westport has just announced a shortlist of five options. Nicole Lockwood is the chair of this taskforce…...

    9.25am

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Now you’ll remember the debate about the Roe 8 highway extension and the question about what is the best way to get freight to port in Perth. Is it road, is it rail, do we need a new port altogether. Well the Government put together the Westport Taskforce to come up with some long-term options on that, and we are talking 50 years into the future. But if you’re going to do it you have to start planning now.
    And Westport has just announced a shortlist of five options. Nicole Lockwood is the chair of this taskforce… [greetings not transcribed]…
    You’ve just released this, can you talk us through the five options?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Sure. Thanks so much for the opportunity. So yeah, we have five options, three of those are stand-alone Kwinana options and two of those are shared-port options with Fremantle and Kwinana sharing the task together.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Now, the difference… have you… the… can you just explain that a little bit more? So you’re talking about…

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    Let’s look at the Kwinana options first.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Kwinana, yeah.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Sure. So look, what we’ve had to do is really, I suppose, step back and look at the
    supply chains and understand what the constraints are. We came up with 25 ways you
    could solve the problem in terms of different options. We had four in Fremantle, four in
    Bunbury and 17 in Kwinana. And then the shortlisting process has really allowed us to
    look at all the criteria and all the factors affecting how trade would work from a social,
    economic, environmental and a cultural perspective, and then shortlist these five as
    the… the top-performing options off that list of 25.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    And so if… if we look at the ones that are stand-alone Kwinana, you said there are three
    of those…

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Yes.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    What are they?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So we’ve got two that are adjacent to the Anketell Road alignment, so we’ve got one
    that’s a land-backed port, so sort of a more traditional port that… that sits alongside the
    coastline. One that’s an island option, again a traditional style, so that’s all the port
    operations happen on the port site, very much like Fremantle does at the moment. And
    then we’ve got a third one that’s closer to the Rowley Road alignment, which is a lighttouch
    footprint, so it’s a highly-automated port that is a much lower footprint on the
    seabed and utilises Latitude 32 as an intermodal to manage the logistics of the site.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Okay. And the two shared port options, how do they work?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So we’ve got one that’s a smaller version of the land-backed option near Anketell Road
    that would be shared then with a Fremantle. But what we do in Fremantle is we allow
    Fremantle to grow to its natural capacity without spending additional money on the port
    and then we… basically, some of the tasks goes into Fremantle and gets dealt with by
    the road and rail coming out of Fremantle and the balance goes to Kwinana. So that’s
    one of the shared options.
    The second one is actually a barging option. So it’s something that’s used quite
    extensively around the world. What happens is that the task… the whole task comes
    into Fremantle Port and then the balance that can’t be dealt with by road and rail out of
    Fremantle gets dealt with by barge to Kwinana where it’s then moved by road out of
    Kwinana.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    And no stand-alone Fremantle option on your shortlist…

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    No.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    … so clearly we cannot… we have to do something, there has to be change.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That’s exactly right. And… and what the work has led us to understand is that the
    constraint for Fremantle Port is not the port precinct, it’s the road and the rail
    connections in. And basically we get to a point in around the mid-2030s where both
    road and rail are… severely constrained and to basically upgrade them requires
    significant changes to both networks which, you know, is in order of magnitude dollars,
    we’re starting to get around the same dollars as you would if you needed to build a new
    facility. So... so that’s the issue.
    The bigger problem for Fremantle is actually its location and the way it interfaces with
    the urban environment and a lot of the upgrades that actually haven’t been part of our
    costings, but we know need to happen, are actually more around general passenger
    network improvements that need to happen to make sure that Fremantle can continue
    to exist.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    Which are those things like widening Stirling Highway, upgrading Roe Highway between
    Kwinana and Orrong Road…

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That’s right.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    … Curtin Avenue link, they would all be things that would need to be improved in order
    for some of these options to move forward.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That’s right, because basically at the moment the freight can’t move freely while the
    passenger task continues to grow. So they are inherent in any… Fremantle option, they
    all need to happen.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    Is Roe 8 one of those options?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    So we weren’t given Roe as an alignment to look at, but what we can do…

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    … but you could have looked at it?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Ah well it wasn’t part of the scope that we were given by Government. But what we’ve
    done, the Leach Highway alignment that you see in… in the work, we can actually
    compare that to what Roe would have offered because we’ve got all the same
    information available which was done as part of the last exercise. What it shows is that
    Roe is a more expensive corridor, it has obviously bigger environmental impacts and we
    have the same constraints in and around the last mile going into the port. So we have a
    number of intersection upgrades required all the way from Marmion Avenue, right
    through Stirling Highway, Canning Highway and right into the port itself at Tydeman
    Road.
    So those issues are the same for both Roe and Leach and the impacts are significant.
    So when we’ve scored the options, they’ve come well below the Kwinana options
    because of that, and because of the scale of investment required, you then end up with
    a superior option in Kwinana because you have scalability, you take that traffic and that
    congestion out of the inner network and you remove the safety issue. And actually the
    Kwinana options give you an unimpeded access from Fremantle… from the port gate in
    Kwinana, all the way to Muchea with basically no traffic lights. So it’s a faster period
    freight route to either a Roe 8 or a Leach Highway option.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Nicole Lockwood is our guest this morning, chair of the Westport Taskforce. And I
    appreciate that Roe 8 wasn’t in the scope but it… should it have been?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Ah well as we all know, it was a very contentious issue leading up to the election and
    the Government, you know, committed to looking at this in an open way. The work had
    been done on Roe, so it allowed us to at least, I suppose, compare those options and
    yeah, we’ve been able to at least make that assessment.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    The option that you’re talking about which sees Leach Highway develop further will in
    fact turn Leach Highway into an 11 kilometre stretch of freeway through Palmyra…

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That’s right.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    Seventy… 70 properties, sorry, would be significant… significantly impacted…

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    That’s right.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    … if that was the plan to go ahead with that.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Yes.

    RUSSELL WOOLF
    So are people in that area likely to be uncertain about their futures at this stage?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Well no, because that… that option was taken off the list. So when we’ve gone through
    the ranking, we’ve decide because of the level of impact and the cost, and the fact that
    ultimately you still end up with a constrained Fremantle, because over time even though
    you’ve upgraded that Leach Highway, you still have an issue of growing cars. So it
    doesn’t give you the long term outcome, so we’ve actually eliminated that option from
    the list and it’s not part of our future work.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    Nicole, very quickly, we’ve only got about 30 seconds left, will there be public comment
    opportunity here?

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    Yes, we’ve got multiple community sessions and anyone can feedback to us anytime on
    any of their views.

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    And will you list your preference? What you think would be the best option at the end of
    that process?

    NADIA MITSOPOULOS
    We will. So end of the year we will submit to government out preferred option.

    NICOLE LOCKWOOD
    I appreciate your time this morning. Nicole Lockwood there, chair of the Westport
    Taskforce.

    Ends…

  • Taskforce backs $4bn Kwinana port, Business News 15/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Bn

    By Mark Beyer

    The state government's Westport taskforce has concluded that all container shipping should be moved out of Fremantle to a new land-backed port in Cockburn Sound, to be built at a cost of about $4 billion. The taskforce released a report today with five short-listed options to meet Perth's long-term bulk freight needs.

    It evaluated 25 port and supply chain options, including a major expansion of Bunbury harbour, but reached a similar conclusion to several previous studies. Its preferred option - a new port adjacent to Anketell Road - was similar to plans presented to the state government...

    By Mark Beyer

    The state government's Westport taskforce has concluded that all container shipping should be moved out of Fremantle to a new land-backed port in Cockburn Sound, to be built at a cost of about $4 billion. The taskforce released a report today with five short-listed options to meet Perth's long-term bulk freight needs.

    It evaluated 25 port and supply chain options, including a major expansion of Bunbury harbour, but reached a similar conclusion to several previous studies. Its preferred option - a new port adjacent to Anketell Road - was similar to plans presented to the state government back in July 2007. The taskforce, chaired by Nicole Lockwood, concluded that Fremantle harbour on its own would not be able to meet Perth's long-term freight task.

    As part of its assessment, the taskforce accepted the findings of an independent 2014 report that suggested the capacity of the existing 'inner harbour' could reach 2.1 million containers - compared to just 770,000 last year. "However, the 2014 report, along with earlier reports, failed to offer a sufficient analysis of the wider freight supply chains necessary to ensure the port's longevity - particularly the road and rail links that move cargo to and from the port," today's taskforce report stated.

    "Westport's investigations have identified that these links are, in fact, the major constraints for the inner harbour, and will reach their capacity by the mid-2030s." The Westport taskforce based its assessment on having a port that can handle at least 3.8 million containers by 2068. "Even if the Inner Harbour can accommodate the previously mentioned 2.1 million TEU, that still leaves it several million containers short of where it needs to be in the long-term."

    The figure of 3.8 million containers implies growth of 3.25 per cent per year - substantially higher than most prior studies. The taskforce concluded that building a new port would be cheaper than upgrading the existing harbour. It estimated the cost of its preferred option would be just under $4 billion, whereas the cost of upgrading the inner harbour to handle 3.8 million containers would be just over $5 billion. Its preferred option is a port extending along the coastline between the Kwinana Bulk Terminal and the Alcoa jetty.

    The proposed port would include an intermodal terminal and be more reliant on road transport over rail. It would be serviced by an extension of Anketell Road linking to Tonkin Hwy, and a duplication of the existing rail track. Potential issues included limited land availability in the preferred area and connecting the last kilometre of Anketell Rd and the rail line through to the port, given existing land holdings and infrastructure in the area.

    The taskforce's number two option was for a slightly smaller port at Cockburn Sound and continuation of Fremantle's inner harbour as a container port. It said the commercial feasibility of having two container ports in close proximity was still being investigated. A downside was losing the 'value capture' offsets of making the Fremantle land available for alternative uses.

    A third option also involved shared ports, but with shallow draught barges being used to transfer containers from Fremantle to Cockburn Sound. It suggested this 'blue highway' option was more likely to be a transitional phase.

    The taskforce presented two other options involving construction of island ports in Cockburn Sound. The state government said the taskforce report supported its own approach. "Several Fremantle-only options were assessed in Westport's process but rated poorly due to significant economic and social impediments," ports minister Alannah MacTiernan said in a statement. "The analysis reinforced that a standalone Fremantle inner harbour would not stack up in the medium to long-term, even with Roe 8 and 9.

    "Westport highlights that even when factoring in a range of major road corridor upgrades, worth billions of dollars, the Fremantle Inner Harbour's transport network will reach capacity by the mid-2030s - meaning planning and design of an Outer Harbour must start now."

    The government noted that building a new port may take up to ten years. Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said investing in a new outer harbour or upgrading Fremantle inner harbour was one of the biggest investment decisions a state government can make. "The work by Westport so far suggests that continually expanding the Fremantle inner harbour, along with the surrounding transport network, doesn't stack up financially due to the many constraints in the surrounding area," Ms Saffioti said.

    "Importantly, Westport found that even with another six unfunded major road upgrades, the network to Fremantle Port won't cope by the mid-2030s, so it's imperative that we plan now and have the Outer Harbour operating before then."

    The taskforce said its short-listed options would now go through a more detailed analysis to determine the strongest option.