Westport In The Media

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See Westport's latest news below.

See Westport's latest news below.

  • Today show's live cross to Westport event in Kwinana, Channel 9 10/09/2019

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    10 months ago
  • Roll up to meeting on port future, Subiaco Post 07/09/2019

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    10 months ago



  • Metronet rules out Freo, Subiaco Post, 07/09/2019

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    10 months ago



  • Interview with Chris Oughton, 6PR 04/09/2019

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    10 months ago

    6PR mornings with Gareth Parker.

    9minutes 33 seconds long.

    Listen to the segment here...

    6PR mornings with Gareth Parker.

    9minutes 33 seconds long.

    Listen to the segment here...

  • The Outer Harbour - time to invest in the future, City of Kwinana 03/09/2019

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    10 months ago

    ​Opinion Piece – City of Kwinana Mayor Carol Adams OAM​

    ​Tuesday, 3 September 2019

    The five future port options for Western Australia, released by the Westport Taskforce recently, all include an Outer Harbour at Kwinana.
    This is great news for my local community but also for our State.
    As the Mayor of Kwinana I am unashamedly in favour of our port as a viable solution to our State’s future port challenges. However, I am also a proud Western Australian who is concerned about the future economic and employment opportunities in the southern corridor of Perth and the Peel region.
    Whatever...

    ​Opinion Piece – City of Kwinana Mayor Carol Adams OAM​

    ​Tuesday, 3 September 2019

    The five future port options for Western Australia, released by the Westport Taskforce recently, all include an Outer Harbour at Kwinana.
    This is great news for my local community but also for our State.
    As the Mayor of Kwinana I am unashamedly in favour of our port as a viable solution to our State’s future port challenges. However, I am also a proud Western Australian who is concerned about the future economic and employment opportunities in the southern corridor of Perth and the Peel region.
    Whatever option is chosen, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to invest in our shared social and economic future. We have to get it right.
    In recent weeks there has been criticism about the suitability of the options and the consideration given to their selection.
    The City of Kwinana respects the work undertaken by the Westforce Taskforce.
    The five preferred options were determined through a meticulous process of multi criteria analysis of each option with input and participation from an extensive list of industry, community, union, environment and government participants.
    It was made clear to participants from the outset that they may not like the end result, but the process would be rigorous, inclusive and transparent.
    The most highly ranked option at this stage is a stand-alone, conventional land-backed port in the Kwinana Industrial Area.
    Investing in the Outer Harbour will recognise the needs of a community whose industrial facilities have brought billions of dollars to the Western Australian economy.
    The expansion of port facilities and the east west freight links have the potential to transform the southern region of Perth and Peel, creating an enormous employment hub which will provide new jobs in maritime, defence, transport, manufacturing and port related businesses.
    Our future port solution needs to be an investment in vital economic infrastructure that will modernise Western Australia’s gateway to and from international markets, and catalyse generational change for the surrounding region.
    The new port in Kwinana will be surrounded by industrial land, the development of which will facilitate the growth of the containerised export industry, accommodating the entry of new industries and thousands of permanent jobs.
    There is no doubt that the 130-year-old Fremantle Port has served our State well, and while it may be capable of some added capacity, it is not capable of meeting our long term needs. As the Westport process has demonstrated, the capacity of a port is not the only consideration; providing safe, effective and efficient vehicle and freight access is also key.
    Transitioning to a new port in Kwinana isn’t as simple as moving to a new home.
    It will take years of careful planning, construction and collaboration before the first container ship arrives.
    It will also involve the upskilling and maintenance of a strong maritime workforce, as well as the planning and delivery of expanded freight, road and rail linkages.
    The challenge is to ensure we don’t wait for a bottleneck to strangle trade. Through the Westport process, the State Government has started the critical planning required to safeguard our economic prosperity.
    Protecting our environment is also a fundamental part of this process. The City of Kwinana is committed to working with the State Government to ensure the highest environmental standards are achieved.
    For generations, Kwinana has been an industrial powerhouse. We boast a world-leading industrial area which makes a significant contribution to our economy.
    Investing in the Outer Harbour will secure life-changing opportunities for a new generation and underpin our State’s continued economic growth.
    It’s time to invest in our shared future.​


  • Freo traffic 'funnel' biggest barrier for port's future: Taskforce Chair, WAtoday 03/09/2019

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    10 months ago

    By Cameron Myles

    Fremantle’s traffic “funnel” is the biggest barricade to the port reaching capacity and means it could hit its limit in the early 2030s, according to the head of the taskforce charged with investigating WA’s freight future.

    Westport independent chair Nicole Lockwood said several unfunded, uncommitted infrastructure projects totalling $4.7 billion – including a trenching and sinking of the rail line and an upgrade to Leach Highway – would be needed to keep the port running for another 20 years.

    And building Roe 8 and 9 wouldn’t make a difference, she said.

    “You’ve got the main trunk routes...

    By Cameron Myles

    Fremantle’s traffic “funnel” is the biggest barricade to the port reaching capacity and means it could hit its limit in the early 2030s, according to the head of the taskforce charged with investigating WA’s freight future.

    Westport independent chair Nicole Lockwood said several unfunded, uncommitted infrastructure projects totalling $4.7 billion – including a trenching and sinking of the rail line and an upgrade to Leach Highway – would be needed to keep the port running for another 20 years.

    And building Roe 8 and 9 wouldn’t make a difference, she said.

    “You’ve got the main trunk routes, whether it’s Roe or Leach, which get your main traffic in, but it’s actually the fact that we narrow into the funnel to get into the port,” Ms Lockwood said.

    “To do that, we need five grade separations all the way into that port precinct, which are significant in terms of visual amenity, in terms of the way that the traffic moves, and in terms of cost.

    “Roe 8 doesn’t solve the problem; it just keeps growing the problem into a narrowing funnel that still hasn’t been solved for the long term.”

    Westport has previously outlined a 10-year timeframe for a new port, from design to operation. It will hand down its final recommendation on a location later this year.

    The taskforce copped flak in recent weeks following the release of its long-awaited shortlist of five options.

    Of those, only two supported retaining Fremantle as a working container port and both proposed sharing the load with a new port in Kwinana.

    The idea of a new port in Kwinana is divisive, with concerns raised over its environmental impact, cost, and whether it is even needed.

    Critics including opposition transport spokeswoman Libby Mettam see development of the outer harbour in Cockburn Sound as a fait accompli under Labor and have decried Westport for not including a possible Roe 8 and 9 in its technical studies.

    “The report is fatally flawed ... [Roe 8/9] would support both the Fremantle Port and any proposed future ports in Kwinana,” Ms Mettam told WAtoday.

    She said the outer harbour was “supposedly the McGowan government’s answer or alternative” to address congestion in the South Metro, and required upgrades to Anketell Road, Tonkin Highway and duplication of rail to develop.

    Central to the issue of congestion on the roads surrounding Fremantle Port is the traffic makeup – specifically, the ratio of trucks to cars.

    Trucks make up about 10 per cent of traffic on the main road into the port – Tydeman Road – and Ms Mettam and the Maritime Union of Australia’s WA branch both claim if container trade was shifted to Kwinana and the Fremantle port precinct opened to developers, pressure on local roads would remain.

    The MUA is confident Fremantle could handle double its current freight volume of 700,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) a year without any major road upgrades, and doubted the $4.7 billion of works cited by Ms Lockwood.

    The union argues a plan of increasing freight exiting the port on rail, and building efficiencies in trucking allow for a longer time horizon.

    “If we use the inflated trade projections in the Westport report, it will be 20 years before container freight volumes in WA double and we would need to look at operating outside the current Monday-Friday 6am-6pm window when 85 per cent of all trucks visit the port,” MUA deputy branch secretary Adrian Evans said.

    Ms Lockwood said Fremantle Port’s 2.1 million TEU capacity was agreed on, but said modelling on the surrounding road network meant the port hit capacity at 1.2 million TEU in the early 2030s.

    “Just to take us through to what the port can handle on the wharf side, we’re talking another $4.7 billion, and that’s just for the next 20 years,” she said.

    “If you’ve got to spend that sort of money just to do what you’re already doing, why would you not spend an equivalent amount of money and create something that gives you longevity and ability to scale, and it moves the disruption from the inner-urban area to a space where you’ve got space to grow?”

    Ms Lockwood flagged a 50-year timeframe to develop the “significant” land in the Fremantle port precinct, but said traffic woes would remain.

    “With a new development would have to come some more innovation, whether it’s public transport or even more point-to-point private transport ... where we’re not all driving one person to a car,” she said.

    “The reality is we don’t have space to keep growing more roads, and tunnelling in WA with the geology we have is problematic and very expensive.”

    ‘Blue highway’ out of the blue?

    Of the five options shortlisted by Westport, the biggest surprise came in the form of a plan to have both Fremantle and Kwinana working as container ports, with freight sent to the outer harbour via shallow draught barges on a “blue highway” shipping route.

    Mr Evans said the option was not part of Westport’s multi-criteria assessment process from the start, and “if they had bothered to include people other than consultants, government staffers and the City of Kwinana in the MCA process it’s one they would have learned is not realistic or viable”.

    Ms Mettam also chided the plan in an opinion piece last week, and said it was “introduced outside of the collaborative process” and without costings.

    But Ms Lockwood said reference groups and sub-groups were briefed on the plan “right from the beginning”, and could show emails supporting that.

    She admitted the plan didn’t score well as a “long-term” option, but “we were keen to look at it ... as a transition step”.

    “What it allows us to do is defer the capital cost in stages, it allows a more incremental impact in the sound – so we gradually build the port as the trade grows – and it also allows us to continue to use Fremantle for the assets that are there, but only to a point that the community and the network can handle the supply chain in,” she said.


  • Interview with Nicole Lockwood – August 2019, Infranomics 02/09/2019

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    10 months ago

    Interview with Nicole Lockwood – August 2019

    September 2, 2019

    In August, InfraNomics interviewed Nicole Lockwood for her views on recent infrastructure developments, the WA economy, women in the workforce and advice for school kids.

    Nicole Lockwood is an experienced non-executive director with a track record on regional, state and national boards focused on infrastructure, planning and regional development. Nicole is principal of Lockwood Advisory, Chair of the Westport Taskforce Steering Committee, Chair of the Freight and Logistics Council of WA, Chair of MNG Mining, Deputy Chair of Infrastructure WA, and Deputy Chair of Leadership WA. Nicole serves as a...

    Interview with Nicole Lockwood – August 2019

    September 2, 2019

    In August, InfraNomics interviewed Nicole Lockwood for her views on recent infrastructure developments, the WA economy, women in the workforce and advice for school kids.

    Nicole Lockwood is an experienced non-executive director with a track record on regional, state and national boards focused on infrastructure, planning and regional development. Nicole is principal of Lockwood Advisory, Chair of the Westport Taskforce Steering Committee, Chair of the Freight and Logistics Council of WA, Chair of MNG Mining, Deputy Chair of Infrastructure WA, and Deputy Chair of Leadership WA. Nicole serves as a Board member for Water Corporation, Tourism WA, Infrastructure Australia and the Internet of Things Alliance Australia. Nicole’s career has spanned a range of fields including local government, regional economic development, law, events and corporate governance.

    As the Westport planning project is reaching the end, what are the main things you have learnt about the project?

    The power of engagement, the value of human relationships and the need for really good quality technical expertise. Every level is important, from engagement within our team to our entire governance structure, to engagement with our Ministers and the community/ industry and other experts, to other ports around the world. It really is everything. It is all about human interaction. Process is important and how you design the project and how you obtain information and testing and socialising it. It is also about how the people are involved and how every individual in the team needs to deliver on the promise of their approach to make it successful, otherwise the whole project is false and has no substance. I’ve been very, very proud of the Westport team internally, that every single person has taken the process and engagement seriously and I have received so much positive feedback about the willingness and the professionalism in what we do. The scope provided by the government was very holistic in nature and included port, road and rail, and allowed the Westport team to have a very different conversation. Learning from Infrastructure Australia and how poorly community engagement has been done in the past in projects around the country. It’s also been important to learn what a lack of holistic planning there has been and particularly the impact and social license, how little is done in that space, certainly from a long term strategic planning perspective. Locally, I’ve learned from having led and delivered projects in the Pilbara and seen what happens when you rush ahead. We had a window of time to deliver projects when there was money so we pushed through a lot to get things done. There is a time and place for that but less and less are we permitted to run that way. I have benefited from learning from these experiences about how we can do things differently, and brought this to the Westport project.

    What would you do differently if you were to do the Westport project again?

    I think we would firstly need to think about the timing. Everybody complained that two years was too long to answer this question. In our view, the only difficulty has been how quickly we have had to move. It does take a lot of time for a project like this to get up and running. You do lose a lot of your initial year just in setting it up. Only after one year did the project really get going and so more time. Thinking about the expertise available to us would be another big things and access to panels or governmental expertise. There are a lot of procedures and processes that took time to set up and made things smoother and quicker once active. Being more realistic up front about what we can and can’t do.

    If Roe 8 & 9 don’t make sense commercially why do you think this issue is in the press recently?

    People want to see action and a commitment to a long term plan. While we are getting there, that plan is still not complete. While uncertainty remains, industry and the community will push for action. There are numerous groups that have different perspectives on the issues of freight and congestion and there are a number of problems to be solved. It is unlikely that one project can solve multiple issues, instead it needs a network response which is what the Westport Taskforce recommendations will deliver.

    What advice would you give to leaders of future major infrastructure projects in WA?

    Long term planning is critical, particularly as infrastructure projects are increasingly required in established urban areas. Gone are the days of infrastructure planning being engineering-led. Economic, environmental and social factors must all be balanced in order to determine the best solution. Do not underestimate the importance of community engagement and establishing social license. Social values and expectations are constantly changing and the ability to deliver new infrastructure is built off the back of a partnership with the community and industry.

    What suggestions would you give for the redevelopment of Fremantle Port?

    Think beyond Australia. That location is unique and needs to have a role and function that is distinct from any other in WA. The opportunities to create something world leading are significant, to celebrate the history and recreate the future of an iconic site.

    Do you think the WA economy is sustainable? Why or why not?

    I think we have the potential to be sustainable but we need to stretch ourselves beyond our natural strengths of resources and leveraging off them. Nature has been kind to us, and human spirit and drive has allowed us to benefit from this abundance of assets. Now it is time to be bold and starting talking up all of the other strengths we have. Tourism, knowledge economy, innovation in automation and boutique foods just to name a few. We have the capability to lead the world in some of these, we just need to start backing ourselves.

    As women are playing a greater role in transforming the workplace from a male dominated/focused environment to a more gender balanced environment, what do you think needs to change in WA to speed up this process?

    We need to stop seeing it as an act of goodwill but rather as good business practice. In fact, it is broader than that. It’s not just about gender diversity, it’s about diversity full stop. I have often been the only woman and the youngest person in the room by at least 15 years for the last decade. Diversity in all its guises is critical for good decision making and successful businesses going forward. The pace of change in terms of social expectations and technology is both an opportunity and a threat for businesses and government. Misunderstood, it can be fatal to an organisation’s success. More specifically, on attracting women, we need to re-think the structure of work. Many roles are still very traditional in terms of hours and operating practice. For me it’s all about value proposition. There are numerous things I consider when looking at a role. Is it aligned to my values; what contribution can I make and what influence can I have over the outcomes; does it complement the other parts of my life that are critical to my happiness like my family and other personal commitments? I think workplaces are going to need to re-think how they attract people. It’s not just women who are looking for flexibility- technology allows us to be far more creative with the way we do work. That is an opportunity for everyone- male, female, old and young.

    To have a decent career in WA in the future, what advice would you give school kids about the skills or disciplines to focus on?

    I see a huge opportunity with the advent of technology for the future of work to be far more meaningful and productive. What we know is that the jobs that are about the head or hands are more likely to be improved through technology. Those jobs that require heart are here to stay! Leadership skills, organisational skills, technology skills and social skills are the way of the future. So, it’s about learning resilience, having an enquiring mind and being open to continuous learning.

    Everyone is busy however, you seem to have more demands on your time than most, especially being a working mum. How do you organise your time?

    I am naturally an organised person so that makes it a little easier, but ultimately it is about having a team behind you, at work and at home and taking care of yourself. I have a wonderful husband who has supported my every move. I have two amazing daughters and the four of us are a team, to run the house and manage the day to day. In addition to that I am very happy to outsource. Anything that I can get help to do, I do. Sleep, exercise, eating well and mental health are all fundamental for me and they all take effort, but they pay you back in spades. Surrounding yourself with capable people who share your values, in your personal life and at work. They give you energy and keep you safe. Then it’s about priorities and deciding what drives you. There are numerous choices every day about how you run your day, it’s about knowing what and who matters and where to spend your most valuable commodity- time.

    Do you have any other comments about developing infrastructure in WA?

    There is rarely a purely win-win solution to any infrastructure project- usually there are a range of problems you are trying to solve and balance against a range of impacts. The important thing is that doing nothing is not a better option and it requires leadership and vision and a willingness to take people on the journey to ensure we can maintain, and maybe even improve, our standard of living into the future.


  • Committed to the best outcome possible, The West 31/08/2019

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    10 months ago



  • ABC Drive interview with Nicole Lockwood 30/08/2019

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    10 months ago

    Geoff Hutchison interview with Nicole Lockwood, Chair, Westport Taskforce.

    Listen to the segment here...

    Summary:
    Hutchison says there was an interesting piece in The West [Australian] today was written by Libby Mettam, the Shadow Minister for Transport. He says she has railed against the Westport Taskforce report which has advocated that the new port be built in the Cockburn Sound. He adds she also repeated a criticism that the task force excluded Roe 8 and Roe 9 from the examination. Hutchison says according to Mettam, Labor is obsessed with closing down Fremantle Port and opening it up to developers...

    Geoff Hutchison interview with Nicole Lockwood, Chair, Westport Taskforce.

    Listen to the segment here...

    Summary:
    Hutchison says there was an interesting piece in The West [Australian] today was written by Libby Mettam, the Shadow Minister for Transport. He says she has railed against the Westport Taskforce report which has advocated that the new port be built in the Cockburn Sound. He adds she also repeated a criticism that the task force excluded Roe 8 and Roe 9 from the examination. Hutchison says according to Mettam, Labor is obsessed with closing down Fremantle Port and opening it up to developers. He says Westport released its project update under the heading 'The Real Facts About Westport: Busting the Myths'.

    Lockwood says they are open to feedback and that part of the process being open and transparent. She says this is a long-term planning exercise. She notes there is a lot of debate around Fremantle's capacity and how Fremantle can transition over time. Lockwood says they have listed a long list of environmental values that are apparent in the Cockburn Sound. She notes the current scientists working on the Cockburn Sound are involved in the process. She says they focused on Leach Highway and it has shown the effort and infrastructure required to access that port. Lockwood says in 10-15 years, depending on any capacity and improvement which can be achieved, there will be a problem. She says there is a big push needed to improve productivity on the network. She notes they have five options, three of which are standalone in Kwinana, but they have two options in which they would allow Fremantle to grow and the rest of the task goes to Kwinana.

    Lockwood says the other option is deemed the 'Blue Highway' which is a barge option. Hutchison says Recfishwest claims the Taskforce has gone against the community's wishes and placed commercial viability of any port development way above environment impact on Cockburn Sound. Lockwood says they have been aware of the values that exist in the Sound and the current recreational activity.


  • Labor's push may doom port of Freo, The West Australian, 29/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Libby Mettam, Shadow Minister for Transport

    It should not come as any surprise that a new port at Cockburn Sound has emerged as the McGowan Labor Government's number one option to handle WA's freight needs.

    After all, it has become abundantly clear that Labor's obsession with closing down Fremantle Port is ultimately aimed at building a harbour no one wants or needs while opening up our beautiful port city to developers.

    Indeed, since its release two weeks ago, there has been plenty of public commentary about the five options presented in the flawed report which is part of the...

    By Libby Mettam, Shadow Minister for Transport

    It should not come as any surprise that a new port at Cockburn Sound has emerged as the McGowan Labor Government's number one option to handle WA's freight needs.

    After all, it has become abundantly clear that Labor's obsession with closing down Fremantle Port is ultimately aimed at building a harbour no one wants or needs while opening up our beautiful port city to developers.

    Indeed, since its release two weeks ago, there has been plenty of public commentary about the five options presented in the flawed report which is part of the $20 million Westport Taskforce process.

    But the most damning criticism of the report is that it was directed to exclude Roe 8 and 9 from examination.

    For those who don't know, Roe 8 and 9 have been approved by Infrastructure Australia and the project can already access $1.2 billion in Federal funding.

    Roe 8 and 9 will solve congestion issues across Perth's southern suburbs.

    In justifying their preferred options in moving port operations to Cockburn Sound, the Westport Taskforce has predicted that the estimated demand for containers at Fremantle Port will treble by 2068. That's an extraordinarily inflated figure half a century away.

    West Australians should be even more concerned about the significant transport challenges associated with developing Cockburn Sound as an outer harbour and dedicated port.

    Adopting such a flawed option will require Anketell Road and more than 30km of Tonkin Highway to be upgraded to a six-lane highway with up to nine grade separations. These upgrades will cut through Beeliar Park, Wandi Nature Reserve and Jandakot Regional Park, as well as requiring the acquisition of private land.

    There are also serious questions about option 3, the proposed Blue Highway - a radical option that will see freight between Cockburn and Fremantle on shallow barges - should Fremantle Harbour remain operational in some token form under this scenario.

    Of greatest concern is that this idea was introduced outside of the collaborative process and included by staff after the fact, with no costings attached. What could possibly go wrong with that thought bubble?

    The report has also overlooked that the potential closure of Fremantle Port and development of this area for residential purposes will create enormous additional pressure on the local road network.

    Congestion around Fremantle Port is predominantly caused by increased passenger traffic, and not trucks, so road upgrades are still required regardless of whether the inner harbour remains operational or not.

    It must be remembered that currently trucks only account for around 5 per cent of congestion on the roads around Fremantle.

    Finally, it's worth considering that Fremantle Port has been a key part of the WA economy for the last 130 years; it's one of the State's key trading enterprises, providing a total contribution in tax equivalent payments, dividends, other taxes and fees of $100.4 million to WA coffers in 2017-18 alone.

    Its daily operations support some 2000 direct jobs and 6000 indirect jobs.

    Looking at the above figures in isolation, you would have to wonder why any government would move to cap its throughput or stifle its operations, and when you consider its capacity is conservatively at least three times the current demand, it becomes quite clear how valuable Fremantle Port remains for Western Australia.

    Arguably, it is unfortunate that as a direct result of a flawed political direction, the outcome and the future demise of Fremantle Port under a McGowan Labor Government has become predetermined.

    Libby Mettam is WA shadow minister for transport Road upgrades are still required regardless of whether the inner harbour remains operational or not.