Westport In The Media

See Westport's latest news below.

See Westport's latest news below.

  • Why the big rush?, Sunday Times 25/8/2019

    4 months ago
    St



  • Port in the storm, Sunday Times 18/8/2019

    4 months ago
    St

    By Gareth Parker

    Multi-million dollar inquiry comes complete with a foregone conclusion WHEN is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?


    When it's politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West's future port needs.

    That's not a criticism of Westport's work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful...

    By Gareth Parker

    Multi-million dollar inquiry comes complete with a foregone conclusion WHEN is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?


    When it's politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West's future port needs.

    That's not a criticism of Westport's work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful work.

    It is just a plain-as-day statement of fact: the inquiry was nobbled from the start, directed to exclude from its detailed projections and planning entirely the idea that Roe 8-9 - a critical missing road link to the port - would be built.

    Lockwood did not even try to sugar coat this reality when I spoke to her.

    "It was not part of the scope we are given," she said.

    "We were given the opportunity to look at the whole (transport) network.

    One component of that (Roe 8/9) was not part of the picture. At the end of the day, that was the decision made on the basis of a strong community view that the Government decided was their agenda going forward." Fremantle Port last year handled 770,000 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) and the working assumption since a planning exercise in 2014 has been that the harbour has the capacity for 2.1 million TEUs.

    Even that was a significant increase on the 1.4 million TEU maximum capacity that was assumed to be Fremantle's cap when Labor was in power last decade and Alannah MacTiernan first put a new port at Kwinana on the agenda.

    Remarkably, Westport's work extends this theoretical maximum capacity well out to 3.8 million TEUs, a radical increase, assuming infrastructure upgrades including dredging, infilling Rous Head and building a new breakwater on its ocean side. The constraint at Fremantle, Lockwood said, is not port capacity, but "very much about the road and rail connection".

    Think about that.

    Fremantle Port is presently less than a quarter of its capacity. Yet the taskforce recommends what the Labor Government is already politically committed to: a new port at Kwinana.

    And Roe 8/9, a potential solution to the biggest constraint - the transport linkages - is off the table altogether.

    Labor has committed to a half-baked upgrade of High Street through the Fremantle Golf Course and and a new roundabout at the Stirling Highway intersection.

    It also has plans for a much-needed replacement for the Fremantle Traffic Bridge, which will include upgraded rail capacity.

    Lockwood says these upgrades alone, according to Westport's analysis, will see the port and transport network functioning adequately until the middle of the 2030s, at which point the roads get full.

    Yet the base case for the modelling that recommends a Kwinana option is a port that will handle 3.8 million to 5.4 million containers, a massive five to seven times the existing container traffic volumes.

    It's all a bit silly. What's clear is that Fremantle Port will serve Perth's needs for at least the next two decades.

    A new port takes a decade to plan and build so by all means preserve options further south beyond that timeframe, but to build it earlier will be a waste of taxpayers' capital.

    We remember Ben Wyatt's 2017 election-eve promise.

    "If we win in 2017 and we don't get that (outer harbour) underway, I will resign," he said.

    Expect an argument soon over the definition of "underway".

  • Residents the last port of call, Cockburn Gazette 22/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Gerry



  • Port numbers don't add up, Weekend West 24/8/2019

    4 months ago
    Bp



  • WA Labor set for 'seismic shift' as Progressive faction disintegrates after chaotic conference, ABC News online 27/8/2019

    3 months ago
    7428168 3x2 700x467

    Excerpt by Jacob Kagi and Nicolas Perpitch

    Kwinana harbour plan backed, McGowan says

    Mr McGowan denied the Westport taskforce, given the job of coming up with solutions to the state's freight and trade problems, was politically skewed as claimed by the Opposition.

    He said retaining Fremantle Port into the long term would not have made its shortlist of options even if Roe 8 and Roe 9 had been considered.

    Mr McGowan said Kwinana had better road and rail corridors, and the Government was sticking with the policy it took to the election of building a new outer harbour, despite opposition...

    Excerpt by Jacob Kagi and Nicolas Perpitch

    Kwinana harbour plan backed, McGowan says

    Mr McGowan denied the Westport taskforce, given the job of coming up with solutions to the state's freight and trade problems, was politically skewed as claimed by the Opposition.

    He said retaining Fremantle Port into the long term would not have made its shortlist of options even if Roe 8 and Roe 9 had been considered.

    Mr McGowan said Kwinana had better road and rail corridors, and the Government was sticking with the policy it took to the election of building a new outer harbour, despite opposition from the MUA and the Liberals.

    "The conference endorsed the Government's position, overwhelmingly actually," he said.

    "So I'm happy with the outcome and we're going to get on with the long-term solution to the freight and trade issues confronting Western Australia."


  • Science ‘skewed’, Fremantle Herald 24/8/2019

    4 months ago
    20190825 fremantle herald   science skewed



  • Port plan unsound, The West Australian 23/8/2019

    4 months ago
    20190823 the west australian   port plan unsound



  • Future of Fremantle Port, 6PR Perth - Mornings 26/8/2019

    4 months ago
    6pr

    Gareth Parker interviews Mayor of Fremantle, Brad Pettitt.

    Transcript of radio interview at 9.07am

    GARETH PARKER

    Now, amid all of the nonsense at the Labor Party Conference on the weekend there was… well at least one policy matter of substance that was debated and it was about the future of Fremantle Port. It took them more than two hours to resolve this, the vote was tight but in the end the Premier’s faction got up. That is, the vote was whether to retain Fremantle as a working port for the long term or not, that ended up being lost.

    Gareth Parker interviews Mayor of Fremantle, Brad Pettitt.

    Transcript of radio interview at 9.07am

    GARETH PARKER

    Now, amid all of the nonsense at the Labor Party Conference on the weekend there was… well at least one policy matter of substance that was debated and it was about the future of Fremantle Port. It took them more than two hours to resolve this, the vote was tight but in the end the Premier’s faction got up. That is, the vote was whether to retain Fremantle as a working port for the long term or not, that ended up being lost.
    But this is still an issue isn’t it, we’ve got the Westport Taskforce, we’ve been having the debate on the program, I’d like your views on it as well, 9221 1882. There’s the context of Roe 8 and Roe 9 which of course the Westport Taskforce was prevented from considering as part of its deliberations. I find myself in unusual agreement and I think perhaps the gentleman you’re about to hear from finds himself… himself in unusual agreement with me. But he’s the Mayor of the City of Fremantle…

    [greetings not transcribed]…

    Now we… look, you know, with the best will in the world we’ve disagreed on a few things recently, that’s okay. You’ve run the numbers on the future of Fremantle Port though.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Yes, and look… I think it has a lot of life in it yet and that’s I guess part of our fear, is that there seems to be a bit of a rush towards building what’s going to be a very expensive outer harbour and ultimately closing down Fremantle sooner rather than later. I guess our view is that would be terrible for Fremantle and more importantly, the maths doesn’t add up in the sense of actually… we don’t need to do that straight away.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, so we’ll come to the maths in a moment but… but your… your position and the council’s position is firmly that you want Fremantle retained as a working port?

    BRAD PETTITT
    Yes, absolutely. So, Fremantle council has been very consistent on this, that the working port should be retained. We accept that there may at some point in the future need to be a overflow port in Kwinana, but the idea of moving the working port is something that we’ve never supported.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, so the question is when an overflow port might be needed in Kwinana?

    BRAD PETTITT
    Well that’s right, and I guess part of my concern around what’s appeared to be coming out of Westport is actually the overflow options kind of being overshadowed by a whole… moving of the whole port, and closing down Fremantle, and I mean, of course for Fremantle that would be… I mean in terms of jobs, in terms of economic activity would be absolutely devastating. But also I think it would just… it would be a huge expense, and we’re talking four to six billion dollars, one of the biggest investments this State will make on something that actually might not be needed for a very long time, if at all.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, so just explain to people the maths that you’ve done. You’ve gone inside some of the Westport Taskforce’s assumptions I guess and you’ve picked them apart.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Yeah, so Westport kind of goes forward and says based on population growth, here’s how… here’s when we think a future port will be needed, and interestingly actually mid-stream Westport changed their own assumptions. So they… they changed the assumption from a 2.6 per cent container growth year-on-year to 2.8 to 3.6 per cent I should say, and what that’s done though is rapidly inflate the amount of containers, or TEUs as they call them, which is the average 20-foot container size that will come through the… through the port, to the point where you start to get these quite extreme numbers and I just went backwards and thought well let’s compare that with what the ABS, Australian Bureau of Statistics, says about population growth, which is actually predicted to be much lower.
    I mean, and just speaking in really rough numbers, at the moment there’s pretty well for every pers… for every three people in WA there’s roughly one container of stuff that we import. Westport’s assuming that by 2068 that we will pretty well have a container each of stuff that we’ll be importing and that three-fold… well, you know, three-time increase just seems pretty unrealistic to me.

    GARETH PARKER
    So just to understand that again, at the moment, for every three people resident in greater Perth, we import about one shipping container per year.

    BRAD PETTITT
    That’s right.

    GARETH PARKER
    And under this assumption, within 50 years we would be tripling that level of container import per person.

    BRAD PETTITT
    It’s almost one… that’s right, almost one person per year, which just, I mean, which just doesn’t make sense, like, I mean obviously how, how much more stuff can we possibly import? Especially at a time when most things are getting smaller, it seems to be one of those assumptions that doesn’t really pass the rationality test, and… and but the whole of this massive investment and the urgent need for it, and the reason it’s said to be an absolutely thing that we’re kind of rushing towards is based on those numbers.
    So I think it’s actually, they kind of need to be brought into question and to say actually, Fremantle Port actually with some other smaller changes could actually serve Perth’s needs for many decades into the future.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, so look, what… what the… the working assumption at the moment is if you don’t do anything to the port at all it can handle probably about 2.1 million containers a year, and at the moment we handle less than 800,000 containers a year…

    BRAD PETTITT
    Yeah.

    GARETH PARKER
    …so there’s plenty of capacity.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Oh that’s right. On the water side, and in fact there’s no real debate around that, everyone agrees that on the water side there’s many decades of capacity left. So the real constraint is around how you deal with the traffic with the transport side and that’s where it’s going to take some smart thinking and some smart investment to actually get more trucks off roads, more onto rail.
    And look, in the Government’s defence there’s been some agreements around say the new Fremantle traffic bridge they have now agreed to fund. In 2021 we’ll have a dedicated freight railway line and that’s really important because then you can actually, rather than just trying to run your trains at night which is currently happening, because there’s not enough room on the shared passenger line, they can actually run trains all… all day long. Then you can actually start to meet those targets for getting 30 per cent of your containers onto rail and those kinds of things can really extend the port’s life.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, what about the extension of the Roe Highway?

    BRAD PETTITT
    Well, the Roe Highway, I… I knew this question would come up. Now I think this is actually…

    GARETH PARKER
    [Laughs] I think this is where we part ways.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Well, potentially. But again, looking at the numbers, even… all the… on average the roads leading to the port, over 90 per cent of vehicles are not trucks going to the port. They are actually, so…

    GARETH PARKER
    Yeah they’re cars moving around the suburbs.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Yeah they are. They’re… they’re predominantly… and so even Tydeman Road, the main road into the port, is only 10 per cent trucks going into the port. So, Roe Highway is actually trying to solve a different problem, which is around broader congestion. Now I would… I would say to you, if you had four to six billion dollars to spend, maybe it’s other kind of investments into public transport and those kinds of things that Perth really needs rather than actually just building more roads or widening roads.
    But that’s a whole ‘nother bigger debate. But I would also say, actually our roads have a huge capacity in them and this is for me actually what I think is really interesting looking forward around our port. As we move to more electric vehicles and electric trucks, which will happen over the next decade, and especially even autonomous vehicles, we could actually see that we could use our road network all night long, at the moment it’s hard to do because you’re running past people’s houses, but if you have quiet trucks running all through the night when there’s no one on the roads, then again the port’s capacity radically changes…

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay.

    BRAD PETTITT
    …because at the moment all the port infrastructure, all the trucks are happening between, during the week, from nine to five.

    GARETH PARKER
    I wonder if Tim Dawson, who we spoke to earlier, I wonder what his members would feel about that, if they become nocturnal.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Well that’s right and look and there is some challenging conversations with, you know, obviously there is going to be change and I think this is the key thing to trying to make these big infrastructure decisions based on kind of the past, when actually the future is going to look quite, quite different, and I’m not sure we want to be spending… rushing to spend that kind of money.
    And I think, I mean, you said it very, very well in your article last week, is that we have to plan for this stuff. The Government is doing the right thing, going through the Westport process, planning for it, but you don’t need to start building it and actually moving towards, you know, some pretty radical decisions around closing Fremantle down too quickly because you might be wasting a serious amount of money.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, if… if a new port was built at Kwinana, at Cockburn Sound, and it took everything, so Fremantle is effectively closed as a working port, what would the future of the town be like if that existing port was… was redeveloped into residential, entertainment, you know, all the stuff that he property developers want and some people advocate for? I mean, would that harm your city or enhance your city?

    BRAD PETTITT
    I think it would undermine the great character of Fremantle, and more importantly would… already we have done a huge amount as a… as a city around trying to get more apartments built and people living downtown. Frankly, selling apartments, building apartments at the moment, is trying to… there are not many things happening more slowly than that in Western Australia.
    So the danger is that you would shift those things out and for decades you would just see a very large empty sandpit on the other side of the river where… where North Pier is at the moment. So this tells me that I think it’s a really good opportunity. Start on the south side. On the south side there’s that huge amount of land that sits just on, on the port which is just used for parking cars that come off the ships, and that’s a real… a much cheaper bit of infrastructure to move to the outer harbour down at Kwinana right now, free up a huge amount of space for real estate.
    If you start to do those things sooner, you can move sheep down there, you can move scrap metal down there, and you get all of those trucks and cars off our roads in… in this part of town, but you don’t need to move the containers, so the containers should be the very last thing that moves because they’re the most expensive thing to move.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. Brad, thank you for your time.

    BRAD PETTITT
    Thanks Gareth.

    Ends..

  • Fremantle Port, 6PR Mornings, 26/8/2019

    3 months ago
    6pr

    Gareth Parker interviews Mayor of Kwinana, Carol Adams.

    Transcript of radio interview at 9.26am.
    GARETH PARKER
    Carol Adams is the Mayor of Kwinana, she was listening to my conversation with the Mayor of Fremantle, Brad Pettitt. Carol, good morning.

    CAROL ADAMS
    Good morning, good morning listeners.

    GARETH PARKER
    What did you make of it?

    CAROL ADAMS
    Look, I think with respect, Mayor Pettitt is losing sight of the fact that you’ve got to start somewhere and this is good long term strategic planning for an outer harbour which is been planned and in the planning for many, many years.

    Gareth Parker interviews Mayor of Kwinana, Carol Adams.

    Transcript of radio interview at 9.26am.

    GARETH PARKER
    Carol Adams is the Mayor of Kwinana, she was listening to my conversation with the Mayor of Fremantle, Brad Pettitt. Carol, good morning.

    CAROL ADAMS
    Good morning, good morning listeners.

    GARETH PARKER
    What did you make of it?

    CAROL ADAMS
    Look, I think with respect, Mayor Pettitt is losing sight of the fact that you’ve got to start somewhere and this is good long term strategic planning for an outer harbour which is been planned and in the planning for many, many years.
    You get criticised about the Government waiting for a bottleneck to happen and we’ve seen this in other, in the Kwinana Freeway, around Cockburn, this is about planning well in advance and an orderly transition for freight and for vehicles to get off the road and stop the bottleneck and whether they like or not the inconvenient truth is that Kwinana is the best place for a new port.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay. I don’t have a problem with planning but the question is whether you need a new port and to me it seems nonsensical that you would commit billions and billions to building a new port when the existing port’s only a third full.

    CAROL ADAMS
    Well look we’ve been part of the Westport Taskforce, the Govt came into it, came into power, with the promise of looking at an outer harbour, they have done, they’ve actually achieved that through the Taskforce. It’s been a very rigorous process with many groups, unions involved being part of the process, they’ve now come up with a report which is obviously going to get picked to pieces by the sounds of it but it’s really about starting somewhere, Gareth, and I think this is what they’re doing and now of course the debate continues.

    GARETH PARKER
    Okay, Carol thank you for your time.

    CAROL ADAMS
    Thank you.

    Ends…


  • No link in harbour plan, Cockburn Gazette 22/8/2019

    4 months ago
    20190822 cockburn gazette   no link in harbour plan