Westport In The Media

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See Westport's latest news below.

See Westport's latest news below.

  • Port missing out, Bunbury Mail 21/08/2019

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    11 months ago



  • Kwinana harbour backed, Sound Telegraph 20/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Pierra Willix

    The Outer Harbour is set to be built in Kwinana after the Westport Taskforce last week revealed the five short-listed options for WA’s new port development.

    The taskforce has spent the past two years investigating options for WA’s future port developments and was considering options in Kwinana, Fremantle and Bunbury.

    Of the short-listed options released last week, three proposed the development should be located in Kwinana, while the other two suggested freight capacity be shared with Fremantle.

    If given the green light, the option ranked the highest would see a standalone conventional land-backed port extending between the...

    By Pierra Willix

    The Outer Harbour is set to be built in Kwinana after the Westport Taskforce last week revealed the five short-listed options for WA’s new port development.

    The taskforce has spent the past two years investigating options for WA’s future port developments and was considering options in Kwinana, Fremantle and Bunbury.

    Of the short-listed options released last week, three proposed the development should be located in Kwinana, while the other two suggested freight capacity be shared with Fremantle.

    If given the green light, the option ranked the highest would see a standalone conventional land-backed port extending between the Kwinana Bulk Terminal and the Alcoa Jetty.

    It is forecasted to handle the full container load of 3.8 million 20ft equivalent units a year.

    The taskforce said this option provided good land transport connections, low environmental impacts in comparison to other options and freed up Fremantle for alternative uses.

    But it conceded that the port would displace the Kwinana horse beach and that connecting the last kilometre of Anketell Road and the rail line through to the port could be challenging given existing landholdings and infrastructure in the area.

    Ports Minister Alannah MacTiernan said an efficient port with modern transport linkages was “essential to the economic life of our State”. “The plan to build a second major port at Kwinana has existed since the Stephenson-Hepburn Plan back in the 1950s. This is not new thinking; the Outer Harbour port has been supported by both sides of Government for decades,” she said.

    Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said continually expanding the Fremantle Inner Harbour, along with the surrounding transport network, did not “stack up financially” because of constraints in the surrounding area, and that the network to the area would not cope in the next 20 years.

    The State Government said building the new port could take up to 10 years to deliver.


  • Greenies and industry divided on report’s options, Sound Telegraph 20/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Pierra Willix

    News that a new Outer Harbour will be built in Kwinana has been met with mixed responses, with industry supporting the decision, while environmentalists say they are concerned the development could destroy Cockburn Sound.

    Kwinana Industries Council director Chris Oughton said the top option selected by the Westport Taskforce was the “most logical and most practical”.

    Mr Oughton said the existence of established freight road and railway links in the area were major selling points and the development of a new port would inevitably be a “boon”, that would attract more overseas investment.

    ...

    By Pierra Willix

    News that a new Outer Harbour will be built in Kwinana has been met with mixed responses, with industry supporting the decision, while environmentalists say they are concerned the development could destroy Cockburn Sound.

    Kwinana Industries Council director Chris Oughton said the top option selected by the Westport Taskforce was the “most logical and most practical”.

    Mr Oughton said the existence of established freight road and railway links in the area were major selling points and the development of a new port would inevitably be a “boon”, that would attract more overseas investment.

    “We wholly support it and it reflects our long-held views that when the port does inevitably move to Kwinana, that’s where it should go,” he said.

    He said business would be attracted to the area once a decision to build a new “internationally competitive port” was announced to the world.

    Mr Oughton said the existence of extensive available land in the Western Trade Coast for further industrial expansion further solidified Kwinana as the logical choice for the development.

    He said of the 6000ha available hectares in the JUarea, 4000 were still to be developed.

    “There is going to be increased growth for the region with this option, and with it will come the generation of a massive amount of new employment,” he said.

    “We encourage the State Government to stay on the path to deliver this crucial piece of overdue infrastructure for the State.”

    City of Kwinana Mayor Carol Adams said the shortlist confirmed what the City had proposed and advocated for since 2015 — that “the future expanded working port belonged together with industry in Kwinana”. “All five short-listed options recognise Kwinana as being central to Perth’s long-term port needs and a new modern port in Kwinana, with uncongested freight linkages and significant capacity to grow, will not only allow WA to prosper, but also support international trade and present a number of opportunities for regional development and employment ” she said.

    “The City has long advocated for the port to move, recognising the finite life of Fremantle and the impractical realities of moving freight through urban areas.”

    She labelled the port development as “essential infrastructure of national significance” and as a “once in a generation economic development boost”.

    But, Fish Army convener Tim Barlow labelled the Westport Taskforce process a “sham”, and said further development in Cockburn Sound would have a devastating environmental impact.

    He said dredging would leave the area without any seagrass, which would then impact wildlife like dolphins, pink snapper, penguins and crayfish.

    Maritime Union of Australia WA deputy secretary Adrian Evans said he was “shocked” by the short-list and said the group had “serious concerns”.

    He said the port development in Kwinana would result in “trucks travelling longer distances, burning more fuel, emitting more pollution, and ultimately costing consumers more.”

    “We know the current port (in Fremantle) has plenty of life left in it.”


  • Bunbury not in container shipping plan, Bunbury Herald 20/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Kate Fielding

    Bunbury Port has been ruled out as a preferred option for the State’s shipping container imports and exports needs.

    The Westport Taskforce last week released its short list of five different port and supply chain options to manage Perth’s growing container freight needs for the next 50 years and beyond.

    While all five options confirm the need for a new container port to be built in Kwinana, Bunbury Port did not feature in any of the shortlisted options.

    Building a new stand-alone port directly north of the Kwinana Bulk Terminal was ranked as the top option with...

    By Kate Fielding

    Bunbury Port has been ruled out as a preferred option for the State’s shipping container imports and exports needs.

    The Westport Taskforce last week released its short list of five different port and supply chain options to manage Perth’s growing container freight needs for the next 50 years and beyond.

    While all five options confirm the need for a new container port to be built in Kwinana, Bunbury Port did not feature in any of the shortlisted options.

    Building a new stand-alone port directly north of the Kwinana Bulk Terminal was ranked as the top option with Bunbury not making the cut based on the capital cost of duplicating the South West main rail line and the costs of transporting containers to Perth.

    Westport independent chairwoman Nicole Lockwood said it was essentially the high costs that made Bunbury unviable.

    “The costs of removing the basalt in Koombana Bay, cost impact per container, the higher operational costs and the costs of expanding the port itself were for Quality Repairs considerable,” Ms Lockwood said. “... the limited number of containers that originate from Bunbury was also a large factor.”

    While Bunbury missed out, Ms Lockwood said there were opportunities to improve the freight supply chain and grow local industries.

    Bunbury MLA Don Punch said the Westport process had “unfolded exactly as I expected” and resulted in positive recommendations for the port.

    Prior to the the 2017 State election, Mr Punch outlined in his “Plan for Bunbury” a desire to develop the role the port could play in the State’s freight task.

    “The intent of Westport was to ensure there was exposure for the capacity of Bunbury Port, its logistics capabilities and its contractors, and this outcome has been achieved,” Mr Punch said.

    “Bunbury Port is a successful port that continues to grow its incoming and outgoing tonnage and to attract the investment and support of Government.

    “It is now firmly on the radar with industry for niche container services, roll on roll off, and other specialist cargoes.”

  • There's no perfect solution to Perth's future freight needs, WAtoday and Sydney Morning Herald 19/08/2019

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    4 months ago

    By Nicole Lockwood

    By now you have probably seen that the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options to meet Perth’s long-term freight growth.

    Westport’s extensive analysis to date has determined these to be the five best options for the state, when weighed up against a range of important environmental, economic and social criteria.

    Some people may be concerned that Westport’s shortlisted options all feature a new port being built in Kwinana, as Cockburn Sound is a much-loved marine habitat and recreational boating and fishing area.

    Equally, it may seem confusing that the currently functional Fremantle Inner Harbour...


    By Nicole Lockwood

    By now you have probably seen that the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options to meet Perth’s long-term freight growth.

    Westport’s extensive analysis to date has determined these to be the five best options for the state, when weighed up against a range of important environmental, economic and social criteria.

    Some people may be concerned that Westport’s shortlisted options all feature a new port being built in Kwinana, as Cockburn Sound is a much-loved marine habitat and recreational boating and fishing area.

    Equally, it may seem confusing that the currently functional Fremantle Inner Harbour is not the answer to the state’s long-term freight needs.

    Let’s take a step back and assess the problem. Perth’s population is growing and will inevitably continue to grow in the future.

    The number of shipping containers – which bring us the everyday products we consume, including food, beverages, nappies, cosmetics, furniture, electronics and more – is increasing in tandem.

    Westport forecasts Perth’s shipping containers requirements will rise from 790,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) currently to more than 3.8 million TEU in 50 years’ time.

    This is not a problem of Westport’s or any government’s creation. It is a problem that cities all over the world are grappling with.

    More and more major ports that were established over a century ago, like Fremantle, are being hemmed in by urban development or being outgrown.

    Something has to be done; Perth’s current infrastructure can’t manage the future freight task that is being forecast.

    I think it’s fair to say that when planning is undertaken proactively and in a measured manner, the outcomes are better than when things are done in an urgent rush. This is what Westport is doing.

    From the outset, Westport faced an incredibly challenging task – there was no simple answer to this freight problem.

    Our three study areas of Fremantle, Kwinana and Bunbury each had impacts – whether they were social (affecting local communities), economic (high cost) or environmental.

    In the end, the multi-criteria analysis tool that Westport has used to objectively assess 25 different options (as recommended by Infrastructure Australia), has clearly determined that Kwinana is the best overall option – with not just five, but most of the Kwinana options ranking higher than the Fremantle and Bunbury options.

    Kwinana rated significantly higher than Fremantle and Bunbury on social and economic criteria. The community impacts and significant costs required to make the Inner Harbour work long-term were too challenging to overcome.

    Bunbury also scored poorly on economic and environmental criteria.

    The strengths of the Kwinana port options were numerous. Given its location in Perth’s strategic industrial estate, existing buffers provide protection from residential development, limiting social impacts.

    The extensive land available at Latitude 32 and the nearby industrial estates provide a unique opportunity for businesses to co-locate adjacent to the port.

    Finally, the Kwinana options have the ability to grow over time and can be designed and built with the latest in sustainability and climate resilience expertise.

    The Westport Beacon 8 explains in detail why Fremantle could not be the long-term solution.

    The roads and rail – regardless of whether Roe 8/9 is considered – are significantly constrained.

    While the Fremantle port wharf has some capacity, it is limited by high density urban development which makes it difficult to get the freight in and out.

    Overcoming those constraints comes with a significant price tag and would have major impacts on surrounding communities and heritage and tourism precincts.

    Many people have voiced their concern about the ongoing interaction between trucks and cars on the existing roads to the Inner Harbour. It is a better outcome – both for safety and efficiency for both cars and trucks – to direct the growth in truck volume to the Kwinana industrial area instead.

    If containers were to move out of Fremantle there are other benefits for the community, like freeing up the Fremantle and western suburbs’ road networks for passenger vehicles; reducing the impacts of noise, emissions and vibration on residents; and removing the need for the freight rail line running through Fremantle, perhaps allowing it to be re-purposed for passenger rail.

    It also allows the redevelopment of Victoria Quay and North Quay for commercial, tourism and community uses.

    Westport’s work shows that billions of dollars needs to be spent on either the Fremantle or Kwinana options; why not spend that money on an option that provides the maximum long-term benefits to the state?

    The one major hurdle for the Kwinana port will be the environment; it’s not possible to establish new infrastructure of this magnitude without having some sort of impact.

    Westport has prioritised environmental values from the very beginning, and any options that may have had significant environmental impacts were eliminated during the shortlisting process.

    Work remains ongoing, however; Westport is continuing to look at ways to mitigate, manage and offset any environmental impacts, and we remain confident of meeting our commitment to improve the overall health of Cockburn Sound through our work over the coming decade.

    Recent advances in port designs and technologies have yielded exciting results, and we have time on our side. There is no reason why Perth can’t have a world-leading port design right here in our backyard.

    Ultimately, Westport’s goal is to facilitate a future, through better transport networks, low cost freight, generating economic growth, and protecting the environment, where our grandchildren get to enjoy the same standard of living – or possibly even a better standard – than we do now.

    Nicole Lockwood is the independent chair of Westport Taskforce.


  • Westport: WA Government has “hamstrung” its own enquiry, The West Australian 18/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Gareth Parker

    When is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?

    When it’s politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West’s future port needs.

    That’s not a criticism of Westport’s work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful work.

    It is just a plain-as-day statement of fact...

    By Gareth Parker

    When is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?

    When it’s politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West’s future port needs.

    That’s not a criticism of Westport’s work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful work.

    It is just a plain-as-day statement of fact: the inquiry was nobbled from the start, directed to exclude from its detailed projections and planning entirely the idea that Roe 8-9 – a critical missing road link to the port – would be built.

    Lockwood did not even try to sugar coat this reality when I spoke to her.

    “It was not part of the scope we are given,” she said.

    “We were given the opportunity to look at the whole (transport) network. One component of that (Roe 8/9) was not part of the picture. At the end of the day, that was the decision made on the basis of a strong community view that the Government decided was their agenda going forward.”

    Fremantle Port last year handled 770,000 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) and the working assumption since a planning exercise in 2014 has been that the harbour has the capacity for 2.1 million TEUs.

    Even that was a significant increase on the 1.4 million TEU maximum capacity that was assumed to be Fremantle’s cap when Labor was in power last decade and Alannah MacTiernan first put a new port at Kwinana on the agenda.

    Remarkably, Westport’s work extends this theoretical maximum capacity well out to 3.8 million TEUs, a radical increase, assuming infrastructure upgrades including dredging, infilling Rous Head and building a new breakwater on its ocean side. The constraint at Fremantle, Lockwood said, is not port capacity, but “very much about the road and rail connection”.

    Think about that. Fremantle Port is presently less than a quarter of its capacity. Yet the taskforce recommends what the Labor Government is already politically committed to: a new port at Kwinana.

    And Roe 8/9, a potential solution to the biggest constraint — the transport linkages — is off the table altogether.

    Labor has committed to a half-baked upgrade of High Street through the Fremantle Golf Course and and a new roundabout at the Stirling Highway intersection.

    It also has plans for a much-needed replacement for the Fremantle Traffic Bridge, which will include upgraded rail capacity.

    Lockwood says these upgrades alone, according to Westport’s analysis, will see the port and transport network functioning adequately until the middle of the 2030s, at which point the roads get full.

    Yet the base case for the modelling that recommends a Kwinana option is a port that will handle 3.8 million to 5.4 million containers, a massive five to seven times the existing container traffic volumes.

    It’s all a bit silly. What’s clear is that Fremantle Port will serve Perth’s needs for at least the next two decades.

    A new port takes a decade to plan and build so by all means preserve options further south beyond that timeframe, but to build it earlier will be a waste of taxpayers’ capital.

    We remember Ben Wyatt’s 2017 election-eve promise.

    “If we win in 2017 and we don’t get that (outer harbour) underway, I will resign,” he said.

    Expect an argument soon over the definition of “underway”.


  • Port in the storm, Sunday Times 18/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Gareth Parker

    Multi-million dollar inquiry comes complete with a foregone conclusion WHEN is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?


    When it's politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West's future port needs.

    That's not a criticism of Westport's work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful...

    By Gareth Parker

    Multi-million dollar inquiry comes complete with a foregone conclusion WHEN is an independent ports inquiry not an independent ports inquiry?


    When it's politically hamstrung from the outset by the Government that commissioned it.

    This, unfortunately, is the charade of Westport, an incredibly detailed, incredibly expensive, and fatally flawed look at Perth and the South West's future port needs.

    That's not a criticism of Westport's work, which comes at a price of $3.2 million to date with a further $10 million in the budget forward estimates, or its chair Nicole Lockwood, whose team has done good and useful work.

    It is just a plain-as-day statement of fact: the inquiry was nobbled from the start, directed to exclude from its detailed projections and planning entirely the idea that Roe 8-9 - a critical missing road link to the port - would be built.

    Lockwood did not even try to sugar coat this reality when I spoke to her.

    "It was not part of the scope we are given," she said.

    "We were given the opportunity to look at the whole (transport) network.

    One component of that (Roe 8/9) was not part of the picture. At the end of the day, that was the decision made on the basis of a strong community view that the Government decided was their agenda going forward." Fremantle Port last year handled 770,000 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) and the working assumption since a planning exercise in 2014 has been that the harbour has the capacity for 2.1 million TEUs.

    Even that was a significant increase on the 1.4 million TEU maximum capacity that was assumed to be Fremantle's cap when Labor was in power last decade and Alannah MacTiernan first put a new port at Kwinana on the agenda.

    Remarkably, Westport's work extends this theoretical maximum capacity well out to 3.8 million TEUs, a radical increase, assuming infrastructure upgrades including dredging, infilling Rous Head and building a new breakwater on its ocean side. The constraint at Fremantle, Lockwood said, is not port capacity, but "very much about the road and rail connection".

    Think about that.

    Fremantle Port is presently less than a quarter of its capacity. Yet the taskforce recommends what the Labor Government is already politically committed to: a new port at Kwinana.

    And Roe 8/9, a potential solution to the biggest constraint - the transport linkages - is off the table altogether.

    Labor has committed to a half-baked upgrade of High Street through the Fremantle Golf Course and and a new roundabout at the Stirling Highway intersection.

    It also has plans for a much-needed replacement for the Fremantle Traffic Bridge, which will include upgraded rail capacity.

    Lockwood says these upgrades alone, according to Westport's analysis, will see the port and transport network functioning adequately until the middle of the 2030s, at which point the roads get full.

    Yet the base case for the modelling that recommends a Kwinana option is a port that will handle 3.8 million to 5.4 million containers, a massive five to seven times the existing container traffic volumes.

    It's all a bit silly. What's clear is that Fremantle Port will serve Perth's needs for at least the next two decades.

    A new port takes a decade to plan and build so by all means preserve options further south beyond that timeframe, but to build it earlier will be a waste of taxpayers' capital.

    We remember Ben Wyatt's 2017 election-eve promise.

    "If we win in 2017 and we don't get that (outer harbour) underway, I will resign," he said.

    Expect an argument soon over the definition of "underway".

  • Keeping port 'will double' Curtin Ave, Subiaco Post 17/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    Doubling the width of Curtin Avenue will be one of the costs of keeping a stand-alone port in Fremantle, Ports Minister Alannah MacTiernan says.

    She said western suburb residents and their Liberal MPs needed to think about the consequences of not building another port.

    On Thursday the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options.

    All proposed a new Kwinana container port, with two having an ongoing role for Fremantle.

    Ms MacTiernan said it would cost about $600million to duplicate the 6.2km of Curtin Avenue, which stretches from Mosman Park to Swanbourne.

    "We don't think it's a good option,"...

    Doubling the width of Curtin Avenue will be one of the costs of keeping a stand-alone port in Fremantle, Ports Minister Alannah MacTiernan says.

    She said western suburb residents and their Liberal MPs needed to think about the consequences of not building another port.

    On Thursday the Westport Taskforce released its shortlist of five port options.

    All proposed a new Kwinana container port, with two having an ongoing role for Fremantle.

    Ms MacTiernan said it would cost about $600million to duplicate the 6.2km of Curtin Avenue, which stretches from Mosman Park to Swanbourne.

    "We don't think it's a good option," Ms MacTiernan said.

    "The Liberals say there should be a stand-alone Fremantle port long-term.

    "We say they don't take into account the social and financial consequences of that, which would be enormous." Ms MacTiernan said the Liberals needed to explain those consequences to their electorates.

    "The modelling we've done will show Curtin Avenue would need to be duplicated by 2031," she said.

  • Time for a backflip, The West Australian 17/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Josh Zimmerman

    The State’s peak business body believes Roe 8 has become a “political football” and has urged the McGowan Government to refer the project to Infrastructure WA for independent assessment.

    Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA has joined forces with the Western Roads Federation to issue the demand after a Westport Taskforce report failed to consider the effect Perth Freight Link would have on the lifespan of Fremantle Port.

    CCCIWA, which has long supported building Roe 8 and 9, said politics had prevented a fair assessment of the project and a “circuit-breaker” was required.

    The divisive road...

    By Josh Zimmerman

    The State’s peak business body believes Roe 8 has become a “political football” and has urged the McGowan Government to refer the project to Infrastructure WA for independent assessment.

    Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA has joined forces with the Western Roads Federation to issue the demand after a Westport Taskforce report failed to consider the effect Perth Freight Link would have on the lifespan of Fremantle Port.

    CCCIWA, which has long supported building Roe 8 and 9, said politics had prevented a fair assessment of the project and a “circuit-breaker” was required.

    The divisive road through the Beeliar wetlands was subject to fierce protests on environmental grounds when the former Barnett government tried to rush through its construction in the months leading up to the 2017 State election.

    One of Labor’s key election promises was shelving Roe 8 and the Government is trying to permanently kill off the project in Parliament by deleting the reserve from future road planning schemes.

    “That is why Infrastructure WA was established — to help take the politics out of how our State’s infrastructure needs are prioritised and support more robust decision-making,” chief executive Chris Rodwell said.

    Released on Thursday, the Westport report short-listed five options to meet WA’s future freight needs, all of which required building an outer harbour in Cockburn Sound.

    Three of the blueprints phase out the use of Fremantle Port completely, with constraints in the surrounding road and rail network highlighted as one of the key shortcomings of the existing facility.

    WRF chairman Craig Smith-Gander said congestion around Fremantle Port was predominantly a result of more passenger traffic rather than trucks and that road upgrades were still needed.

    “Our State can’t afford for infrastructure projects that support economic growth and job creation, like Roe 8 and 9, to be held back by politics,” he said.


  • New road for Roe 8, Weekend West 17/08/2019

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    11 months ago

    By Josh Zimmerman

    The State's peak business body believes Roe 8 has become a "political football" and has urged the McGowan Government to refer the project to Infrastructure WA for independent assessment.

    Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA has joined forces with the Western Roads Federation to issue the demand after a Westport Taskforce report failed to consider the effect Perth Freight Link would have on the lifespan of Fremantle Port.

    CCCIWA, which has long supported building Roe 8 and 9, said politics had prevented a fair assessment of the project and a "circuit-breaker" was required.

    The divisive road...

    By Josh Zimmerman

    The State's peak business body believes Roe 8 has become a "political football" and has urged the McGowan Government to refer the project to Infrastructure WA for independent assessment.

    Chamber of Commerce and Industry of WA has joined forces with the Western Roads Federation to issue the demand after a Westport Taskforce report failed to consider the effect Perth Freight Link would have on the lifespan of Fremantle Port.

    CCCIWA, which has long supported building Roe 8 and 9, said politics had prevented a fair assessment of the project and a "circuit-breaker" was required.

    The divisive road through the Beeliar wetlands was subject to fierce protests on environmental grounds when the former Barnett government tried to rush through its construction in the months leading up to the 2017 State election.

    One of Labor's key election promises was shelving Roe 8 and the Government is trying to permanently kill off the project in Parliament by deleting the reserve from future road planning schemes.

    "That is why Infrastructure WA was established - to help take the politics out of how our State's infrastructure needs are prioritised and support more robust decision-making," chief executive Chris Rodwell said.

    Released on Thursday, the Westport report short-listed five options to meet WA's future freight needs, all of which required building an outer harbour in Cockburn Sound.

    Three of the blueprints phase out the use of Fremantle Port completely, with constraints in the surrounding road and rail network highlighted as one of the key shortcomings of the existing facility.

    WRF chairman Craig SmithGander said congestion around Fremantle Port was predominantly a result of more passenger traffic rather than trucks and that road upgrades were still needed.

    "Our State can't afford for infrastructure projects that support economic growth and job creation, like Roe 8 and 9, to be held back by politics," he said.